By the Knife, Steve Partridge

By the Knife, Steve Partridge

By the Knife, Steve Partridge

By the Knife, Steve Partridge

This historical novel is set in the middle of the Eighteenth Century, a period of near constant naval warfare, combined with the threat of piracy. We follow two very different men – one the orphaned son of a school teacher, the other a product of the London slums. Both end up at sea, one as a naval officer and one as a pirate. The plot follows their intertwined lives as they move from Britain to the Caribbean, and from the Mediterranean to West Africa.

The author paints a good picture of this complex period, with a broader canvas than many naval novels. Our naval officer's foes include the Spanish, the French, pirates and slavers, while our pirate's allies include the Barbary Corsairs, still a real threat to shipping during this period. The unstable nature of the Caribbean, with competing European powers and no one dominant, is the most common backdrop to the story, and makes a suitable scene for adventure.

I found this to be a very enjoyable read, with a convincing villain working within a convincing underworld, and a hero who isn't too flawless. The two stories don't always overlap, but they are both entertaining, and come together convincing at key moments.

Chapters

Author: Steve Partridge
Edition: Paperback
Pages: 384
Publisher: Matador
Year: 2015



‘Just discovered the best accidental Partridge in history’

We’ve featured no end of ‘accidental Partridge’ moments on these pages, when TV presenters and the like accidentally channel their inner Alan Partridge, but they might not come any better than this.

It’s Sky Sports’ Ted Kravitz talking to Formula 1 driver Sebastian Vettel and it’s 12 seconds very well spent, shared by @adam_major1 on Twitter.

Ted is by all accounts a bit of a national treasure and people thought it surely had to be deliberate.

Surely a deliberate Partridge – he does the impression and references cheese. I'm sure Ted knows his Alan lore.

&mdash RetroTube Archive TV Podcast (@retro_tube) April 28, 2021

Either way, we love it. And just in case you were wondering where the conversation went after that, here’s what happened next.

And what Ted himself had to say about it.

Seb’s right, it was a waste of cheese.. F1 Testing Notebook, day 1 is here:https://t.co/721ZA1KfQw

&mdash Ted Kravitz (@tedkravitz) March 13, 2021

If it IS the best accidental Partridge of all time, this is surely a close second.


Five reasons to watch ‘Alan Partridge’

Over the past 20 years, Alan Partridge has grown into one of the most iconic fictional characters in British sitcom history — taking his place alongside Tony Hancock (“Hancock’s Half Hour”), Albert Steptoe (“Steptoe and Son”) and Basil Fawlty (“Fawlty Towers”).

Created and played by comedian Steve Coogan, Alan Partridge is a narcissistic buffoon first introduced to the British public as a clueless sportscaster on “The Day Today,” a satiric comedy show which aired on BBC2. The character proved so popular that Coogan spun Partridge off into “Knowing Me, Knowing You,” a BBC2 comedy series in which he hosted his own (really bad) BBC TV talk show. Two more series, “I’m Alan Partridge” and “Mid Morning Matters with Alan Partridge,” followed after that. They really can’t get enough of him over there.

American audiences will have their chance to meet Alan via his big-screen debut in “Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa.” Here’s why you should care:

1. Coogan created the character with Armando Iannucci — the mastermind behind HBO’s “Veep,” starring Emmy winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

2. Partridge’s ABBA obsession is like nothing you’ve seen. His TV show “Knowing Me, Knowing You,” his famous catchphrase (“A-ha!”) and his son’s name (Fernando) are all references to the band’s songs.

3. Who else has ever written about an addiction to Toblerone chocolate (while in the throes of a nervous breakdown)? Partridge did just that in a critically trashed memoir, “Bouncing Back” (thousands of copies of which were pulped when it failed to sell).

4. He’s unashamed to be a contrarian. On his love for Paul McCartney’s ’70s group, Wings: “They’re only the band the Beatles could have been.”

5. It’s British absurdity at its finest. Desperate to get back on the BBC, Partridge once pitched a show about “monkey tennis.”


Contents

The Fish era Edit

Formation and early years (1978–1982) Edit

—Fish on his first impression of the band [12]

In 1977, Mick Pointer joined Electric Gypsy, which also included Doug Irvine on bass. Pointer and Irvine left to form their own band, Silmarillion, after J.R.R. Tolkien's book The Silmarillion, in late 1978. They played one London show as an instrumental band with Neal Cockle (keys) and Martin Jenner (guitar). 1979 saw a new line-up of Mick Pointer, Steve Rothery, Doug Irvine and Brian Jelliman. They played their first concert at Berkhamsted Civic Centre, Hertfordshire, on 1 March 1980. [13] According to Pointer, it was at this stage that the name was shortened to Marillion. [14] [15] [16]

Other sources have that the band name was shortened to Marillion in 1981 to avoid potential copyright conflicts, [17] at the same time as Fish and bassist William 'Diz' Minnitt [18] replaced original bassist/vocalist Doug Irvine following an audition at Leyland Farm Studios in Buckinghamshire on 2 January 1981. Rothery, drummer Mick Pointer, and keyboardist Brian Jelliman completed this line-up the first gig with this line-up was at the Red Lion Pub [19] at 35 Market Square in Bicester on 14 March 1981. Irvine eventually joined the band Steam Shed. [20] By the end of 1981, Kelly had replaced Jelliman, with Trewavas replacing Minnitt in 1982. [21] Minnitt later formed Pride of Passion [22] and went on to perform with Zealey and Moore. [23]

Marillion's first recordings were two demos recorded in March and the summer of 1980, prior to Fish and Minnitt joining the band. Two versions of the Spring demo circulate amongst collectors the first has four tracks "The Haunting of Gill House", "Herne the Hunter", an untitled track known as "Scott's Porridge", and "Alice". The second version has an instrumental version of "Alice" in place of "Scott's Porridge". All tracks are instrumental apart from "Alice", with vocals by Doug Irvine. The summer demo has three tracks "Close" (parts of which were later rewritten into "The Web", "He Knows You Know" and "Chelsea Monday"), "Lady Fantasy" (an original based on an earlier Electric Gypsy song), and another version of "Alice". Both were recorded at The Enid's studio in Hertfordshire. Following Irvine's departure and replacement by Fish and Minnitt, the band recorded another demo tape, produced by Les Payne, in July 1981 that included early versions of "He Knows You Know", "Garden Party", and "Charting the Single". [ citation needed ]

The group attracted attention with a three-track session for the Friday Rock Show (early versions of "The Web", "Three Boats Down from The Candy", and "Forgotten Sons"). [ citation needed ] They were subsequently signed by EMI Records. They released their first single, "Market Square Heroes", in 1982, with the epic song "Grendel" on the B-side of the 12" version. Following the single, the band released their first full-length album in 1983.

Script for a Jester's Tear and Fugazi (1983–1984) Edit

The music on their debut album, Script for a Jester's Tear, was born out of the intensive performances of the previous years. Although it had some progressive rock stylings, it also had a darker edge. [ citation needed ] The album was a commercial success, peaking at number seven on the UK album chart and producing the singles "He Knows You Know" (number 35) and "Garden Party" (number 16). [24] Although they were accused of being Genesis soundalikes, [25] the album reached the Platinum certification and has been credited with giving a second life to progressive rock bands from the previous era. [25]

Following the UK tour to promote Script for a Jester's Tear, Mick Pointer was dismissed due to Fish's dissatisfaction with what he later described as the drummer's "awful" timing and failure to develop as a musician with the rest of the band. [26] Ian Mosley, who had played for acts including Darryl Way's Wolf and the Gordon Giltrap band, was eventually secured as Pointer's replacement after a series of other drummers, including Andy Ward and Jonathan Mover, were short-lived. [27] Despite the numerous production problems encountered during this period, the second album, Fugazi, built upon the success of the first album with a more streamlined hard rock sound. [28] It improved on the chart placing of its predecessor by reaching the top five and produced the singles "Punch and Judy" (number 29) and "Assassing" (number 22). [24]

In November 1984, Marillion then released their first live album, Real to Reel, featuring songs from Fugazi and Script for a Jester's Tear, as well as "Cinderella Search" (B-side to 'Assassing') and the debut single "Market Square Heroes", which had not been available on album until that point. The album entered the UK album charts at No. 8.

Misplaced Childhood and international success (1985–1986) Edit

Their third and commercially most successful studio album was Misplaced Childhood, which had a more mainstream sound. The lead single from the album, "Kayleigh", received major promotion by EMI and gained heavy rotation on BBC Radio 1 and Independent Local Radio stations as well as television appearances, bringing the band to the attention of a much wider audience. "Kayleigh" reached number two in the UK and "Lavender" reached number five these remain the only singles by the band to enter the top five. [24]

Following the exposure given to "Kayleigh" and its subsequent chart success, the album became their only number one in the UK, knocking Bryan Ferry's Boys and Girls off the top spot and holding off a challenge from Sting, whose first solo album, The Dream of the Blue Turtles, entered the chart in the same week. [29] [30] The third single from the album, "Heart of Lothian", became another top-thirty hit for the band, reaching No. 29. The album came sixth in Kerrang! magazine's "Albums of the Year" in 1985. [31] "Kayleigh" also gave Marillion its sole entry on the Billboard Hot 100, reaching No. 74. [32] In the summer of 1986, the band played to their biggest ever audience as special guests to Queen at a festival in Germany attended by a crowd of over 150,000 people. [33] They were also offered the Highlander soundtrack but turned it down because of their world tour, a missed opportunity which Rothery later said he regretted. [34]

Clutching at Straws and the departure of Fish (1987–1988) Edit

The fourth studio album, Clutching at Straws, shed some of its predecessor's pop stylings and retreated into a darker exploration of excess, alcoholism, and life on the road, representing the strains of constant touring that would result in the departure of Fish to pursue a solo career. It did continue the group's commercial success, however lead single "Incommunicado" charted at No. 6 in the UK charts gaining the band an appearance on Top of the Pops, and the album entered the UK album chart at No. 2, Marillion's second highest placing. "Sugar Mice" and "Warm Wet Circles" also became hit singles, both reaching No. 22. Fish has also stated in interviews since that he believes this was the best album he made with the band. [35] The album came sixth in Kerrang! magazine's "Albums of the Year" in 1987, equalling the ranking given to Misplaced Childhood. It was also included in Q magazine's "50 Best Recordings of the Year". [36] Fish explained his reasons for leaving in an interview in 2003:

"By 1987 we were over-playing live because the manager was on 20 per cent of the gross. He was making a fantastic amount of money while we were working our asses off. Then I found a bit of paper proposing an American tour. At the end of the day the band would have needed a £14,000 loan from EMI as tour support to do it. That was when I knew that, if I stayed with the band, I'd probably end up a raging alcoholic and be found overdosed and dying in a big house in Oxford with Irish wolfhounds at the bottom of my bed." [37]

Fish gave the band a choice to continue with either him or the manager, [38] John Arnison. [39] They sided with the manager and Fish left for a solo career. [38] His last live performance with Marillion was at Craigtoun Country Park on 23 July 1988. [40] Due to lengthy legal battles, informal contact between Fish and the other four band members apparently did not resume until 1999. Fish would later disclose in the liner notes to the 2-CD reissue of Clutching at Straws that he and his former bandmates had met up and discussed the demise of the band and renewed their friendship, and had come to the consensus that an excessive touring schedule and too much pressure from the band's management led to the rift.

Although reportedly now on good personal terms, both camps had always made it very clear that the oft-speculated-upon reunion would never happen. However, when Fish headlined the 'Hobble on the Cobbles' free concert in Aylesbury's Market Square on 26 August 2007, the attraction of playing their debut single in its spiritual home proved strong enough to overcome any lingering bad feeling between the former band members, and Kelly, Mosley, Rothery, and Trewavas replaced Fish's backing band for an emotional encore of "Market Square Heroes".

In a press interview following the event, Fish denied this would lead to a full reunion, saying that: "Hogarth does a great job with the band. We forged different paths over the 19 years." [41]

The Steve Hogarth era Edit

Seasons End and Holidays in Eden (1989–1991) Edit

After the split, the band found Steve Hogarth, the former keyboardist and sometime vocalist of The Europeans. Hogarth stepped into a difficult situation, as the group had already recorded some demos of the next studio album, which eventually would have become Seasons End. Hogarth was a significant contrast to Fish, coming from a new wave musical background instead of progressive rock. He had also never owned a Marillion album before joining the band. [42]

After Fish left the group (taking his lyrics with him), Hogarth set to work crafting new lyrics to existing songs with lyricist and author John Helmer. The demo sessions of the songs from Seasons End with Fish vocals and lyrics can be found on the bonus disc of the remastered version of Clutching at Straws, while the lyrics found their way into various Fish solo albums such as his first solo album, Vigil in a Wilderness of Mirrors, some snippets on his second, Internal Exile and even a line or two found its way to his third album, Suits.

Hogarth's second album with the band, Holidays in Eden, was the first he wrote in partnership with them and includes the song "Dry Land", which Hogarth had written and recorded in his earlier duo, How We Live. As quoted from Steve Hogarth, "Holidays in Eden was to become Marillion's "pop"est album ever, and was greeted with delight by many, and dismay by some of the hardcore fans". [43] Despite its pop stylings, the album failed to cross over beyond the band's existing fanbase and produced no major hit singles.

Brave, Afraid of Sunlight and split with EMI Records (1992–1995) Edit

Holidays in Eden was followed by Brave, a dark and richly complex concept album that took the band 18 months to release. The album also marked the start of the band's longtime relationship with producer Dave Meegan. An independent film based on the album, which featured the band, was also released.

The next album, Afraid of Sunlight, would be the band's last album with record label EMI Records. Once again, it received little promotion, no mainstream radio airplay and its sales were disappointing for the band. Despite this, it was one of their most critically acclaimed albums and was included in Q's 50 Best Albums of 1995. [44] One track of note on the album is Out of This World, a song about Donald Campbell, who died while trying to set a speed record on water. The song inspired an effort to recover both Campbell's body and the "Bluebird K7," the boat which Campbell crashed in, from the water. [45] The recovery was finally undertaken in 2001, and both Steve Hogarth and Steve Rothery were invited. [46] In 1998, Steve Hogarth said this was the best album he had made with the band. [47]

This Strange Engine, Radiation and marillion.com (1996–1999) Edit

What followed was a string of albums and events that saw Marillion struggling to find their place in the music business. This Strange Engine was released in 1997 with little promotion from their new label Castle Records, and the band could not afford to make tour stops in the United States. Their dedicated US fan base decided to solve the problem by raising some $60,000 themselves online to give to the band to come to the US. [48] The band's loyal fanbase (combined with the Internet) would eventually become vital to their existence.

The band's tenth album Radiation saw them taking a different approach and was received by fans with mixed reactions. [49]

marillion.com was released the following year and showed some progression in the new direction. The band were still unhappy with their record label situation.

Anoraknophobia and Marbles (2000–2006) Edit

The band decided that they would try a radical experiment by asking their fans if they would help fund the recording of the next album by pre-ordering it before recording even started. The result was over 12,000 pre-orders which raised enough money to record and release Anoraknophobia in 2001. [50] The band was able to strike a deal with EMI to also help distribute the album. This allowed Marillion to retain all the rights to their music while enjoying commercial distribution. By this time the band had also parted company with their long-time manager, saving 20 per cent of the band's income.

The success of Anoraknophobia allowed the band to start recording their next album, but they decided to leverage their fanbase once again to help raise money towards marketing and promotion of a new album. The band put up the album for pre-order in mid-production. This time fans responded by pre-ordering 18,000 copies. [51]

Marbles was released in 2004 with a 2-CD version that is only available at Marillion's website – a 'thank-you' gesture to the over 18,000 fans who pre-ordered it, and as even a further thanks to the fans, their names were credited in the sleeve notes (this 'thank you' to the fans also occurred with the previous album, Anoraknophobia). [ citation needed ]

The band's management organised the biggest promotional schedule since they had left EMI and Steve Hogarth secured interviews with prominent broadcasters on BBC Radio, including Matthew Wright, Bob Harris, Stuart Maconie, Simon Mayo and Mark Lawson. Marbles also became the band's most critically acclaimed album since Afraid of Sunlight, prompting many positive reviews in the press. [52] [53] [54] [55] [56] [57] [58] The band released "You're Gone" as the lead single from the album. Aware that it was unlikely to gain much mainstream radio airplay, the band released the single in three separate formats and encouraged fans to buy a copy of each to get the single into the UK Top Ten. The single reached No. 7, making it the first Marillion song to reach the UK Top Ten since "Incommunicado" in 1987 and the band's first Top 40 entry since "Beautiful" in 1995. The second single from the album, "Don't Hurt Yourself", reached No. 16. Following this, they released a download-only single, "The Damage (live)", recorded at the band's sell-out gig at the London Astoria. All of this succeeded in putting the band back in the public consciousness, making the campaign a success. Marillion continued to tour throughout 2005 playing several summer festivals and embarking on acoustic tours of both Europe and the United States, followed up by the "Not Quite Christmas Tour" of Europe throughout the end of 2005.

A new DVD, Colours and Sound, was released in Feb 2006, documenting the creation, promotion, release, and subsequent European tour in support of the album Marbles.

Somewhere Else and Happiness is the Road (2007–2008) Edit

April 2007 saw Marillion release their fourteenth studio album Somewhere Else, their first album in 10 years to make the UK Top No. 30. The success of the album was further underscored by that of the download-only single "See it Like a Baby", making UK No. 45 (March 2007) and the traditional CD release of "Thankyou Whoever You Are / Most Toys", which made UK No. 15 and No. 6 in the Netherlands during June 2007.

In July 2008 the band posted a contest for fans to create a music video for the soon-to-be released single "Whatever is Wrong with You", and post it on YouTube. The winner would win £5,000. [59] [60]

Happiness Is the Road, released in October 2008, again featured a pre-order "deluxe edition" with a list of the fans who bought in advance, and a more straightforward regular release. It is another double album, with one disc based on a concept and the second containing the other songs that aren't a part of the theme. Before the album's release, on 9 September 2008, Marillion pre-released their album via p2p networks themselves. Upon attempting to play the downloaded files, users were shown a video from the band explaining why they had taken this route. Downloaders were then able to opt to purchase the album at a user-defined price or select to receive DRM-free files for free, in exchange for an email address. The band explained that although they do not support piracy, they realised their music would inevitably be distributed online anyway, and wanted to attempt to engage with p2p users and make the best of the situation. [61]

Less is More and Sounds That Can't Be Made (2009–2014) Edit

The band's sixteenth studio album (released 2 October 2009) was an acoustic album featuring new arrangements of previously released tracks (except one, the new track: "It's Not Your Fault") entitled Less Is More.

Their seventeenth studio album, titled Sounds That Can't Be Made, was released in September 2012. Two versions of the album were released: A 2-disc 'deluxe' version that included a DVD with 'making-of' features and sound-check recordings and a single CD jewel case version. The 'deluxe' version also included a 128-page book that incorporated lyrics, artwork and, as was the case with Anoraknophobia, Marbles and Happiness is the Road, the names of people who pre-ordered the album. Parts of the album were recorded at Peter Gabriel's Real World Studios in 2011.

Marillion were awarded "Band of the Year" at the annual Progressive Music Awards in 2013. [62]

Fuck Everyone and Run (F E A R) (2015–present) Edit

The band announced in September 2015 that they were working on a new album, provisionally titled M18 and later confirmed as Fuck Everyone and Run (F E A R). As with several of their previous releases, the recording of the album was to be funded by fan pre-orders, this time through direct-to-fan website PledgeMusic. The album was released on 23 September 2016 [63] [64] debuting at number 4 in the official UK charts of 30 September 2016, their highest placing since Clutching at Straws nearly three decades earlier. In November 2016, they announced their first ever show at the Royal Albert Hall in London, in October 2017. [65] The gig sold out in just 4 minutes and was filmed for DVD release. They also won "UK Band of the Year" at the 2017 Progressive Music Awards. [66] In March 2018, the film of the Royal Albert Hall gig was premiered at cinemas around the UK, before the DVD launch, with the band attending the showing in London. On 6 April the concert was released as All One Tonight - Live at the Royal Albert Hall.

In March 2018, Steve Hogarth was involved with fellow musician Howard Jones in helping to unveil a memorial to David Bowie, which is situated close to Aylesbury's Market Square. [67] [68] The memorial was the inspiration of promoter David Stopps, who booked Bowie to appear at the Friars Aylesbury where he debuted Ziggy Stardust. The bulk of the funds for the memorial were raised at a gig held at the Waterside Theatre in Aylesbury on the evening of the unveiling which Marillion headlined, alongside Howard Jones, John Otway and the Dung Beatles, all of whom have close association to Aylesbury and in particular, the Friars.

Marillion's music has changed stylistically throughout their career. The band themselves stated that each new album tends to represent a reaction to the preceding one, and for this reason their output is difficult to 'pigeonhole'. Although the band has featured two very distinct and different vocalists, the core instrumental line-up [70] of Steve Rothery (lead guitar, and the sole 'pre-Fish' original member), Pete Trewavas (bass), Mark Kelly (keyboards) and Ian Mosley (drums) has been unchanged since 1984.

Their 1980s sound (with Fish on vocals) was guitar and keyboard-led neo-progressive rock. They have been described at their outset as "a bridge between punk and classic progressive rock". [5] Guitarist Steve Rothery wrote most of the music during the period Fish was in the band. [71] Iron Maiden guitarist Janick Gers commented, "What I love so much about Marillion is that they could be very strong and powerful and have very quiet passages, but the powerful stuff was really edgy and heavy. I just thought he (Fish) wrote good lyrics, and they wrote good music, and it fit together effortlessly." [72]

They were often compared unfavourably by critics during the Fish era with the Peter Gabriel era of Genesis, [73] although the band had many other influences. Fish was influenced by a wide range of artists and his favourite albums were by artists such as Van der Graaf Generator, Joni Mitchell, the Who, Pink Floyd, John Martyn, Yes, Lowell George, Led Zeppelin, Roy Harper, the Faces, the Beatles and Supertramp. [74] Rothery's main influences were Jimi Hendrix, Carlos Santana, David Gilmour, Andrew Latimer of Camel, Steve Hackett, Jeff Beck and Joni Mitchell, with Gordon Giltrap also an early influence on the development of his playing style. [75] Kelly's biggest inspiration was Yes keyboardist Rick Wakeman, [76] and Trewavas' favourite bass player was Paul McCartney. [77] Original drummer Mick Pointer was a huge fan of Neil Peart's drumming in his favourite band, Rush. [78]

During the Steve Hogarth era, their sound has been compared, on various albums, to more contemporary acts such as U2, [79] Radiohead, [49] [80] Coldplay, [80] Muse, [80] Talk Talk, [81] Elbow, [81] and Massive Attack. [81] In 2016, Hogarth himself was quoted as describing the band: "If Pink Floyd and Radiohead had a love child that was in touch with their feminine side, they would be us." [82] According to an interview with Rothery in 2016, many of their later albums with Hogarth had been written by jamming. [71]

The chief music critic of The Guardian, Alexis Petridis, has described Marillion as "perennially unfashionable prog-rockers". [83] On the subject of joining the band in 1989, Steve Hogarth said in a 2001 interview: "At about the same time, Matt Johnson of The The asked me to play piano on his tour. I always say I had to make a choice between the most hip band in the world, and the least." In the same conversation, he said: "We're just tired of the opinions of people who haven't heard anything we've done in ten years. A lot of what's spread about this band is laughable." [42]

Much of the band's enduring and unfashionable reputation stems from their emergence in the early 1980s as the most commercially successful band of the neo-progressive rock movement, an unexpected revival of the progressive rock musical style that had fallen out of critical favour in the mid-1970s. Some early critics were quick to dismiss the band as clones of Peter Gabriel-era Genesis due to musical similarities, such as their extended songs, a prominent and Mellotron-influenced keyboard sound, vivid and fantastical lyrics and the equally vivid and fantastical artwork by Mark Wilkinson used for the sleeves of their albums and singles. Lead singer Fish was also often compared with Gabriel due to his early vocal style and theatrical stage performances, which in the early years included wearing face paint.

As Jonh Wilde summarised in Melody Maker in 1989:

At the end of a strange year for pop music, Marillion appeared in November 1982 with "Market Square Heroes". There were many strange things about 1982, but Marillion were the strangest of them all. For six years, they stood out of time. Marillion were the unhippest group going. As punk was becoming a distant echo, they appeared with a sound and an attitude that gazed back longingly to the age of Seventies pomp. When compared to Yes, Genesis and ELP, they would take it as a compliment. The Eighties have seen some odd phenomena. But none quite as odd as Marillion. Along the way, as if by glorious fluke, they turned out some singles that everybody quietly liked – "Garden Party", "Punch and Judy" and "Incommunicado". By this time, Marillion did not need the support of the hip-conscious. They were massive. Perhaps the oddest thing about Marillion was that they became one of the biggest groups of the decade. They might have been an anomaly but they were monstrously effective. [84]

The band's unfashionable reputation and image has often been mentioned in the media, even in otherwise positive reviews. In Q in 1987, David Hepworth wrote: "Marillion may represent the inelegant, unglamorous, public bar end of the current Rock Renaissance but they are no less part of it for that. Clutching at Straws suggests that they may be finally coming in from the cold." [85] In the same magazine in 1995, Dave Henderson wrote: "It's not yet possible to be sacked for showing an affinity for Marillion, but has there ever been a band with a larger stigma attached?" He also argued that if the album Afraid of Sunlight "had been made by a new, no baggage-of-the-past combo, it would be greeted with open arms, hailed as virtual genius." [86] In Record Collector in 2002, Tim Jones argued they were "one of the most unfairly berated bands in Britain" and "one of its best live rock acts." [87] In 2004, Classic Rock's Jon Hotten wrote: "That genre thing has been a bugbear of Marillion's, but it no longer seems relevant. What are Radiohead if not a progressive band?" and said Marillion were "making strong, singular music with the courage of their convictions, and we should treasure them more than we do." [54] In the Q & Mojo Classic Special Edition Pink Floyd & The Story of Prog Rock, an article on Marillion written by Mick Wall described them as "probably the most misunderstood band in the world". [88]

In 2007, Stephen Dalton of The Times stated:

The band have just released their 14th album, Somewhere Else, which is really rather good. Containing tracks that shimmer like Coldplay, ache like Radiohead and thunder like Muse, it is better than 80 per cent of this month's releases. But you are unlikely to hear Marillion on British radio, read about them in the music press or see them play a major festival. This is largely because Marillion have – how can we put this kindly? – an image problem. Their music is still perceived as bloated, bombastic mullet-haired prog-rock, even by people who have never heard it. In fairness, they did once release an album called Script for a Jester's Tear. But, come on, we all had bad hair days in the 1980s. [80]

Despite publishing a very good review for their 1995 album Afraid of Sunlight and including it in their 50 Best Albums of 1995, Q refused to interview the band or write a feature on them. Steve Hogarth later said: "How can they say, this is an amazing record. no, we don't want to talk to you? It's hard to take when they say, here's a very average record. we'll put you on the front cover." [42]

In 2001, the television critic of The Guardian, Gareth McLean, used his review of the Michael Lewis BBC Two documentary, Next: The Future Just Happened, to concentrate on launching a scathing attack on the band, whose appearance only constituted one segment of the programme. He described them as "once dodgy and now completely rubbish" and he characterised their fans as "slightly simple folks". He also dismissed the band's efforts to continue their career without a label by dealing directly with their fans on the Internet, writing: "One suspects that their decision occurred round about the time that the record industry decided to shun Marillion." [89]

Rachel Cooke, a writer for The Observer and New Statesman, has repeatedly referred negatively to the band and insulted their fans in her articles. [90] [91] [92] [93]

In an interview in 2000, Hogarth expressed regret about the band retaining their name after he joined:

If we had known when I joined Marillion what we know now, we'd have changed the name and been a new band. It was a mistake to keep the name, because what it represented in the mid-Eighties is a millstone we now carry. If we'd changed it, I think we would have been better off. We would have been judged for our music. It's such a grave injustice that the media constantly calls us a 'dinosaur prog band'. They only say that out of ignorance because they haven't listened to anything we've done for the last 15 bloody years. If you hear anything we've done in the last five or six years, that description is totally irrelevant. It's a massive frustration that no-one will play our stuff. If we send our single to Radio 1 they say: 'Sorry, we don't play music by bands who are over so-many years old. and here's the new U2 single.' I suppose it's something everyone has to cope with – every band are remembered for their big hit single, irrespective of how much they change over the years. But you can only transcend that by continuing to have hits. It's Catch 22. You know, at some stage, someone has to notice that we're doing interesting things. Someday someone will take a retrospective look at us and be surprised. [94]

The 2013 film Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa includes a joke reference to a former drummer of the band. The band were quoted: "We know Marillion are seen as 'uncool' but we were delighted to be a part of it." [95]

Marillion are widely considered to have been one of the first mainstream acts to have fully recognised and tapped the potential for commercial musicians to interact with their fans via the internet, starting in around 1996, and are nowadays often characterised as a rock & roll 'Web Cottage Industry'. [96] [97] The history of the band's use of the Internet is described by Michael Lewis in the book Next: The Future Just Happened as an example of how the Internet is shifting power away from established elites, such as multinational record labels and record producers.

The band are renowned for having an extremely dedicated following (often self-termed 'Freaks'), [96] with some fans regularly travelling significant distances to attend single gigs, driven in large part by the close fan base involvement which the band cultivate via their website, podcasts, biennial conventions [98] and regular fanclub [99] publications. The release of their 2001 album Anoraknophobia, which was funded by their fans through advance orders instead of by the band signing to a record company, gained significant attention and was called "a unique funding campaign" by the BBC. [100] Writing for The Guardian, Alexis Petridis described Marillion as "the undisputed pioneers" of fan-funded music. [83]


By the Knife, Steve Partridge - History

Partridge Island, located at the entrance to Saint John Harbour, has a history that is hard to match in terms of stirring heroism and stark tragedy as well as noteworthy importance. Undaunted by the passage of a history as turbulent as the Bay of Fundy waters washing on its shores, the great rocky barrenness of Partridge Island stands as a silent guardian of Saint John Harbor. In times of peace, the monstrous jagged rock symbolizes security for tired mariners guiding trans-oceanic titans into the port of Saint John. In time of war, the 80-foot high cliffs become fortresses with great guns stretching their ugly snouts over the eastern sea lanes.

The Island's story begins centuries ago, in the time of the Indians. To them it was "Quak'm'kagan'ik" meaning "a piece cut out", a reference to their belief that the Island was created when their great hero-god Glooscap smashed the dam Big Beaver had built at the Reversing falls and a piece of the dam was swept in the rush of water to the mouth of the harbour where it came to rest to form the Island.

Following the arrival of the Loyalists in 1783 and the formation of the City of Saint John, the need for a lighthouse to aid shipping was realized. Such a light was erected on Partridge Island and came into existence In 1791, being only the third to have been built in Canada. Soon after, a signal station was also located on the Island and it was used for many years to alert the City to vessels approaching up the Bay.

Today a number of traces of the Island's exciting past are to be found there. But all too evident as well is the way it has been neglected. Many people would like to see Partridge Island made an historic site and become a place apart where the visitor could go there to feel the ties with the past where so much happened to effect the development of the Saint John area. Such a proposal is well worthy of supports.

George MacBeath, Director.
The New Brunswick Museum.

During the first part of the 1800's, Ireland was supporting its people very largely by its potato crop. It happened that for several seasons these crops were poor and this led to what was known as "The Potato Famine." With their chief means of sustenance removed, many of the people became paupers. To help ease the situation, thousands of these unfortunates were shipped to North America. They were half-starved and in a debilitated state, and the vast majority came in vessels that were poorly provisioned and dreadfully overcrowded. Some owners and masters took the opportunity to make money and added an extra deck in their vessels, allowing them to nearly double the number of passengers they could carry. This practice was fairly widespread and in Saint John alone, thirteen shipmasters were convicted of overcrowding and illfeeding their passengers.

Thousands of Irish immigrants destined to dock at Saint John stopped at Partridge Island for medical inspection and those who were sick were quarantined there. The Quarantine Process All sick people and those in contact with the sick were brought to the island. On the island, they were subjected to a kerosene shower. Item #1A on Map, followed by a hot water shower to wash away the oil. Their belongings were steam cleaned. They were to spend the remainder of their days on the island until they got better. Those who died were buried in one of the six graveyards on the island. Item #31 on Map. Dr. W. S. Harding was the resident physician, but as the number of sick grew he required assistance and Dr. Patrick Collins and Dr. J. H. Harding joined him. At the Miramichi, too, ships arrived with fever victims who were cared for by Dr. Vondy. He, like Dr. Collins of Saint John, paid with his life for his heroism. In the year 1847 alone more than six hundred people died of typhoid fever and were buried on Partridge Island.

In 1854, Saint John was visited by another epidemic. This was cholera, brought here by one of the ships carrying German immigrants to the province. The disease was confined to Partridge Island for two months, but then in June it spread to the city, where it raged with no let-up until cold weather in October brought relief. The medical men and the citizens generally took every step they knew of to check the outbreak. Despite a wide use of medicines and disinfectants, and the evacuation of a considerable portion of the residents, 1,500 of our people died in a period of eight weeks.

In 1927, a forty-foot Celtic cross was erected on Partridge Island in memory of the Irish immigrants who died during the fever scourge of 1847. Those immigrants that survived the fever and cholera had many talents and they and their descendants have made them available to the city and province that gave them a home. They have brought honour to New Brunswick in art, literature, drama and many of the professions., both in Canada and the United States.

All images on this page and content below are courtesy of Harold E.Wright from the Heritage Resources and Saint John Community College

Partridge Island has an unexpected amount of wildlife and plant life living along its shores and on the land. However, in the winter, there is not much life to be seen. Occasionally an owl can be seen, but usually only Great Black-backed gulls, megansers, crows, and starlings reside there during these cold months.

The spring is a wonderful site to see on the island. Many birds have been spotted during the spring migration. Some remain only for a few days to rest and feed, while others remain to breed. Other animals that live on the island include muskrats, raccoon, beaver, mink, river otter, and an occasional coyote. No reptiles have been found and there is only one amphibian, the Red-backed Salamander, living there.

Since the Quarantine Station closed in 1941, and military operations ceased in 1947, plant life has thrived on Partridge Island. Disturbed areas, old ruins and foundations have been invaded and colonized by some plant species and, in turn, succeeded by others.

On the island you can find rhodora and coltsfoot flowers, lilacs, buttercups, starflowers, bunchberries, and Mountain Wood Ferns, as well as hundreds of other beautiful flowers. There are alders, elderberry, Mountain Ash, Grey Birch, and Trembling Aspens, but only one oak tree has been found.

Partridge Island still functions today as a Coast Guard lightstation. The concrete, automated light tower that stands now has many predecessors.

New Brunswick's first lightstation was built on Partridge Island in 1791 and staffed by Captain Samuel Duffy. It was made of wood and it burned down in 1832. The second light tower lasted from 1832 to 1880. The third light tower was modified in 1911. Another five meters was added to its height and it was equipped with a more powerful lamp. The light tower that dominates the present view of Partridge Island replaced this tower in 1959. The picture above is the light tower in 1910.

The present light tower was automated in 1989. It flashes every seven and a half seconds (8 flashes per minute).

Despite the light towers, fog continued to cause nautical disasters. Some engineers attempted to solve the problem with various fog alarms. In 1801, a minute gun was installed to help ship navigators, and was replaced by a 1000 lb. bell in 1831. Neither method proved a success. Over a one hundred year period, close to two dozen ships had been lost off the shores of Partridge Island.

WORLD'S FIRST STEAM FOG ALARM

In 1852, Robert Foulis patented the Illuminating Gas Apparatus, and the next year he, along with his gas maker William Murdoch, were working to convert the light from oil-burning to gas-burning. As his work progressed, he was inspired to construct a fog alarm using a steam whistle. He submitted his plans to the Lighthouse Commissioners in 1858 and didn't get a response. The next thing he knew, a local engineer named T. T. Vernon Smith built the the world's first steam operated fog alarm, based on Foulis' plans. While Foulis sought legal action, the alarm was being praised by local pilots and skippers.

". on the whole coast of America there is not another alarm equal to the one spoken of . in making the harbour on Tuesday, a dense fog prevailing at the time . eight miles below the island we heard the Whistle, and without the least difficulty entered the harbour." -- Captain Winchester of the steamer Eastern City, 1860.


Foulis received his deserved recognition in 1864. This is the world's first steam fog alarm circa 1865. It is a water color sketch created by J.C. Miles. Item #25 on Map

In 1942, a concrete whistle house was built. This structure housed the fog alarm, diesel generators, and the beacon and radio equipment until the station's automation in 1989. Item #28 on Map


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Louis was also sporting Sid's recognisable black spiky hair, while adding to his punk look with a chunky silver chain and belt.

Shocking: His chest appeared scratched and bloody, which may be a nod to Sid's habit of slashing his arms, legs and chest during live shows (pictured 1978)

Dead ringer: The actor, 17, was filming opposite Sid's lover Nancy Spungen [Emma Appleton], who was found stabbed to death in a New York hotel where she was staying with Sid

On tour: Louis could later be seen sat beside his embattled lover Nancy, who was sporting a platinum head of curly locks and a heavy coat of make-up including lots of eyeliner

Punk history: Steve Jones, whose memoirs provides the basis for the series, claims to have had sex with Nancy, but it is for her relationship with hell-raiser Sid, the violence-obsessed face of the punk rock movement, for which she will be forever remembered

He was also donning black jeans with a pair of black shoes.

Who is Louis Partridge?

Teen actor Louis' career looks set to launch into the stratosphere with his portrayal of tragic rocker Sid - but he is already an established star.

His first role came at the tender age of 11 in short film, Beneath Water.

He previously gained wider recognition for his role as Piero de' Medici in historical drama Medici in 2017.

His breakthrough role came as Tewkesbury in 2020 mystery film Enola Holmes alongside Stranger Things star Millie Bobby Brown.

He has appeared in 2017's Paddington 2.

Louis could later be seen sat beside his embattled lover Nancy, who was sporting a platinum head of curly locks and a heavy coat of make-up including lots of eyeliner.

Steve Jones, whose memoirs provides the basis for the series, claims to have had sex with Nancy, but it is for her relationship with hell-raiser Sid, the violence-obsessed face of the punk rock movement, for which she will be forever remembered.

Nancy's body was discovered in the the bathroom of the New York hotel room they shared in October 1978, months after the Sex Pistols fell apart.

The notorious case ended with Vicious being charged with his girlfriend's murder – but dying of a heroin overdose before it came to court.

Nancy reportedly bought drugs to meet musicians and became a heroin addict, funding her habit at one time by working as a prostitute.

Later, she moved to England 'specifically to get a Sex Pistol for a boyfriend', recalled a friend.

Other contemporaries she came to the UK to chase after Heartbreakers Johnny Thunders and Jerry Nolan, who had left New York.

Sid Vicious, born John Ritchie, was a fixture of the King's Road punk scene who had been brought in earlier that year to replace original Sex Pistols bassist Glen Matlock.

He could not play a note but he was as foul-mouthed and audacious as singer Johnny Rotten - John Lydon, now of I'm A Celebrity. fame - often stripping down to his underpants to reveal a skinny torso scarred by self-inflicted knife wounds.

The couple moved in together in London and Nancy reportedly introduced her boyfriend to heroin. She joined the Sex Pistols on their US tour the following year.

Tragic: Nancy's body was discovered in the the bathroom of the New York hotel room they shared in October 1978, months after the Sex Pistols fell apart

Death: The notorious case ended with Vicious being charged with his girlfriend's murder – but dying of a heroin overdose before it came to court (pictured in together in 1978)

Photographer Bob Gruen, who joined the Pistols on what would be their final tour with Vicious, recalled in an interview with New York magazine: 'I remember talking to Sid on the bus, and he really seemed to care for her.

'He didn't have any anger or hatred toward her. Sid very much loved Nancy. They seemed to communicate and connect.'

The band collapsed at the end of the tour and Sid returned to London with Nancy to attempt a solo career.

Rocker: His chest appeared scratched and bloody, which may be a nod to Sid's habit of slashing his arms, legs and chest during live shows

By the end of August 1978, they returned to New York to start a new life, but overdoses were taking their toll and they were still dependent on drugs.

They moved into the Chelsea Hotel, which had once been a Mecca for writers and artists - Dylan Thomas, Andy Warhol and Bob Dylan had all once lived there - but by the late 1970s, was little more than a sprawling drugs den populated by users.

On October 12, 1978, Nancy was found dead in the bathroom of Room 100 of the Chelsea Hotel, a trail of blood leading to the bed she shared with Vicious, who had bought a hunting knife a few days earlier.

Witnesses who were at a party in their room the evening before say Vicious was out for the count, thanks to a heavy dose of barbiturates.

Sex Pistols star: Sid Vicious, born John Ritchie, was a fixture of the King's Road punk scene who had been brought in earlier that year to replace original Sex Pistols bassist Glen Matlock

Some theories say she could have been killed by a visitor in a squabble over drugs or money.

It was Vicious himself who phoned police to say he had found her dead body, and an hour later, in a holding cell at the Third Homicide Division, Vicious famously confessed: 'I did it because I'm a dirty dog.'

The police, it seemed, had their man. But Vicious was later to retract his confession, claiming he could not recall anything about the night Nancy had died.

Nevertheless he was remanded in custody, but his manager, the colourful Malcolm McLaren, hired a top New York lawyer called James Merberg to win him bail.

Toby Wallace, who plays Steve Jones, was also on board the tour bus to film scenes

Rocker life: Jacob Slater channelled drummer Paul Cook as he sported a quirky blonde hairstyle and vintage shearling jacket (Paul pictured right in 1970s)

Within days, Vicious was free on a $50,000 licence which had been put up by his record label boss, Richard Branson.

A little more than a month later, however, Sid was back inside the maximum security Riker's Island jail after glassing a man in a fight in a New York club. He spent nearly two months behind bars in the prison's detox wing before he was again released on bail.

By then, Vicious had a new girlfriend, a would-be actress called Michelle Robson. On the day of his release - February 1, 1979 - Vicious, his mother Anne Beverley and a few friends went back to Robson's apartment for a celebration meal.

After eating spaghetti bolognese, Vicious asked his mother - herself a hopeless addict - to find him some drugs.

Taking to the streets: Toby and Anson Boon were also spotted on location with Louis

Chilling: Jacob sat beside a radio while looking out the window on the bus

Boozy one! Anson was surrounded by several cans of beer

Unknown to Vicious, this batch of heroin was more than 95 per cent pure and nearly three times stronger than most of the heroin sold on the streets of New York. After taking it, Sid collapsed.

He was revived by his girlfriend and mother, but they decided not to call an ambulance because they feared he would be thrown back in jail for breaking his bail conditions. It was to prove a fatal mistake.

Later that night, alone in the bedroom, he injected more of the powerful heroin. The following morning, he was found dead.

Whether or not Vicious killed Nancy is unlikely to ever be resolved with any certainty, but in her memoir, Deborah Spungen suggests her daughter's boyfriend wasn't to blame.

Role: Anson, right, looked almost unrecognisable as he transformed into punk rocker Johnny Rotten, left, in 1978

Hello! The duo appeared distracted by something outside as they prepared to film

The six-episode series began principal photography last month, and Danny serves as director and Executive Producer.

Based on Jones' 2018 memoir Lonely Boy: Tales from a Sex Pistol, the supporting cast also includes Game of Thrones star Maisie as punk icon Jordan as well as Sydney Chandler as Chrissie Hynde.

Pistol moves from West London's council estates, to Westwood and McLaren's notorious Kings Road SEX shop, to the international controversy that came with the release of Never Mind the B******s.

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Their single 'God Save the Queen' was banned by the BBC and reached Number 1 on the UK's NME chart, but appeared at Number 2 on the Official UK Singles chart, leading to accusations that the song was purposely kept off the top spot.

Boyle has had an acclaimed TV and movie career. His 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire was nominated for ten Academy Awards and won eight, including the Academy Award for Best Director.

In 2012, Boyle was the artistic director for the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics. He was subsequently offered a knighthood as part of the New Year Honours but declined.

Filming: Toby Wallace, left in costume, is portraying guitarist Steve Jones, pictured right in 1978

In January, Nick Grad, President, Original Programming, FX Entertainment, said in a statement: 'It's great to be back in business with Danny Boyle, an exceptional artist responsible for so many great feature films and TV series.'

'Steve Jones was at the centre of the storm that shook the rock establishment and we're thrilled to have Danny and the rest of the creative team tell his story as a member of one of music's most notorious bands - the Sex Pistols.'

'Imagine breaking into the world of The Crown and Downton Abbey with your mates and screaming your songs and your fury at all they represent,' added Boyle. 'This is the moment that British society and culture changed forever.'

'It is the detonation point for British street culture. where ordinary young people had the stage and vented their fury and their fashion…and everyone had to watch & listen…and everyone feared them or followed them.'

'The Sex Pistols. At its centre was a young charming illiterate kleptomaniac - a hero for the times - Steve Jones, who became in his own words, the 94th greatest guitarist of all time. This is how he got there.'

Pistols will be released on FX and Hulu in 2022.

The real rockers: Pistols - set for release next year - is based on the legendary rock band - consisting of Johnny Rotten, Sid Vicious, Steve Jones, Paul Cook and Glen Matlock - and their rise to fame in the 1970s (the band L-R minus Glen Matlock pictured in 1978)

The tragic tale of Sex Pistols rocker Sid Vicious

He could not play a note but he was as foul-mouthed and audacious as singer Johnny Rotten - John Lydon, now of I'm A Celebrity. fame - often stripping down to his underpants to reveal a skinny torso scarred by self-inflicted knife wounds.

As well as his punk rocker persona - he will be forever remembered for his turbulent romance with girlfriend Nancy Spungen.

Nancy reportedly bought drugs to meet musicians and became a heroin addict, funding her habit at one time by working as a prostitute.

Later, she moved to England 'specifically to get a Sex Pistol for a boyfriend', recalled a friend. Other contemporaries she came to the UK to chase after Heartbreakers Johnny Thunders and Jerry Nolan, who had left New York.

Sid Vicious, born John Ritchie, was a fixture of the King's Road punk scene who had been brought in earlier that year to replace original Sex Pistols bassist Glen Matlock.

The couple moved in together in London and Nancy reportedly introduced her boyfriend to heroin. She joined the Sex Pistols on their US tour the following year.

The band collapsed at the end of the tour and Sid returned to London with Nancy to attempt a solo career.

By the end of August 1978, they returned to New York to start a new life, but overdoses were taking their toll and they were still dependent on drugs.

They moved into the Chelsea Hotel, which had once been a Mecca for writers and artists - Dylan Thomas, Andy Warhol and Bob Dylan had all once lived there - but by the late 1970s, was little more than a sprawling drugs den populated by users.

On October 12, 1978, Nancy was found dead in the bathroom of Room 100 of the Chelsea Hotel, a trail of blood leading to the bed she shared with Vicious, who had bought a hunting knife a few days earlier.

Witnesses who were at a party in their room the evening before say Vicious was out for the count, thanks to a heavy dose of barbiturates.

Some theories say she could have been killed by a visitor in a squabble over drugs or money.

It was Vicious himself who phoned police to say he had found her dead body, and an hour later, in a holding cell at the Third Homicide Division, Vicious famously confessed: 'I did it because I'm a dirty dog.'

The police, it seemed, had their man. But Vicious was later to retract his confession, claiming he could not recall anything about the night Nancy had died.

Nevertheless he was remanded in custody, but his manager, the colourful Malcolm McLaren, hired a top New York lawyer called James Merberg to win him bail.

Within days, Vicious was free on a $50,000 licence which had been put up by his record label boss, Richard Branson.

A little more than a month later, however, Sid was back inside the maximum security Riker's Island jail after glassing a man in a fight in a New York club. He spent nearly two months behind bars in the prison's detox wing before he was again released on bail.

By then, Vicious had a new girlfriend, a would-be actress called Michelle Robson. On the day of his release - February 1, 1979 - Vicious, his mother Anne Beverley and a few friends went back to Robson's apartment for a celebration meal.

After eating spaghetti bolognese, Vicious asked his mother - herself a hopeless addict - to find him some drugs.

Unknown to Vicious, this batch of heroin was more than 95 per cent pure and nearly three times stronger than most of the heroin sold on the streets of New York. After taking it, Sid collapsed.

He was revived by his girlfriend and mother, but they decided not to call an ambulance because they feared he would be thrown back in jail for breaking his bail conditions. It was to prove a fatal mistake.

Later that night, alone in the bedroom, he injected more of the powerful heroin. The following morning, he was found dead.

Whether or not Vicious killed Nancy is unlikely to ever be resolved with any certainty, but in her memoir, Deborah Spungen suggests her daughter's boyfriend wasn't to blame.


Author: Steven Harper

I’m an introvert with an advocate personality. So I was pretty reserved in grad school seminars until a fellow student went off about how people shouldn’t have kids, and I launched into a lecture about how I’m the seventh of ten children of really great parents. My parents made sure the scriptures were read early and often in their home, but it was up to me to decide whether I would love the scriptures. I learned that the Book of Mormon is true shortly before I served in the Canada Winnipeg Mission. But It took me awhile to learn to love the scriptures. Not until I was teaching Dora, a Lutheran woman in her sixties, did I really want to know what they said and meant. That desire didn’t leave when I returned to BYU, so I changed my major from engineering to ancient near eastern studies and started a series of courses in Biblical Hebrew. I learned that the Bible was way more complicated than I had thought, and I doubted I could master the complexity. When I took a course on early Church history I decided I had to master that, so I switched my major and set my sights on a PhD in early American history. Along the way I wrote an MA thesis about who joined the Church in the 1830s and why. I wrote my dissertation on a little-known 1737 fraud by which the sons of William Penn evicted the Lenape Indians from their homeland. I started teaching in the history and religion departments at BYU-Hawaii, then in 2002 got the chance to join the Religious Education faculty at BYU in Provo and become an editor of The Joseph Smith Papers. That combo was enticement enough to leave Hawaii, where I thought I would miss the land but ended up missing the people. A decade later I taught the Bible (go figure) to great students at the BYU Jerusalem Center for Near Eastern Studies. Before that I had been serving on committees tasked by the Church Historian and Recorder with planning a new history of the Church. When I got home from Jerusalem I was invited to join the Church History Department in Salt Lake City to be the managing historian of that project. For the next six years it was my humbling privilege to work with devoted and talented people to produce Saints: The Story of the Church of Jesus Christ in the Latter Days. More than one million people are reading it online and more than 400,000 print copies have been sold. In 2018 I got my other dream job back: professor of Church history and doctrine at BYU. I was also named the editor of BYU Studies, where I had formative experience as a student intern a long time ago. The best thing about me is my wife and children, but they forbade me to say much about them here. Hannah Salvesen is my daughter, and I’ll share lots of links to the great stuff she produces. Thanks to Hannah and Scott Salvesen for building this site and advising me patiently about all things related to the world wide web. View all posts by Steven Harper


How Much Is Steve Coogan Worth?

54-year-old English actor, Steve Coogan has an estimated net worth of $12 million. His primary source of income is a career as an actor, producer, and writer. The average salary of an English actor is somewhere around £10.65- £120 per hour.

Steve Coogan's breakthrough came with the voice work on the long-running puppet show, Spitting Image. Besides, after landing spot on the radio show, he made an even bigger splash on a comedy show, On The Hour.

Moreover, his character as Alan Partridge in TV shows like Knowing Me and Knowing You With Alan Partridge won five BAFTAs. Throughout the 90s, Coogan developed many other comic characters.

Steven appeared in movies like 24 Hour Party People, Tropic Thunder, Night at the Museum which earned him fame outside the United Kingdom. Ever since he has been considered one of the greatest comedic talents who hid his true self.


Miscellaneous XTC Press Clippings: 1989

That'll Be The Day

popular figures answer questions about the future of rock 'n' roll

Spy: Musically speaking, what's the next hot country?

Andy Partridge: The thing to steal from? As Russia opens up more and more, you're going to see lots of their sort of music &mdash their version of cajun, or their version of rap, or their version of folk.

Spy: What do you think Bob Dylan will be doing in 20 years?

Andy: I'm tempted to say pushing up daisies. To be truthful, who cares? Mrs. Dylan might care. Mrs. Dylan is a very nice lady.

Spy: What do you think Debbie Gibson will be doing in 20 years?

Andy: I think there's going to be a fund to reinstate her. You know, &ldquoSave Debbie Gibson.&rdquo

Spy: What do you think David Byrne will be doing in 20 years?

Andy: I hope he isn't doing a Talking Heads revival tour.

Spy: What will you be doing in 20 years?

Andy: I shall be a belligerent drunk.

The Edmonton Journal
June 8, 1989, page C1

One-day-at-a-time lifestyle pulls Partridge from abyss

by Helen Metella

"I'm drunk on the everyday," enthuses Andy Partridge with an uncomplicated sunniness that runs counter to everything you might expect.

Partridge is the co-founder of XTC, a brainy British act that's made nine intricate, ambitious, often demanding albums which, save for one hit 10 years ago (Making Plans For Nigel), have caused barely a ripple of recognition outside of England.

The band (originally a quartet, now a trio including Colin Moulding and David Gregory) hasn't toured since 1982 because the strain proved nearly lethal to Partridge's physical and mental health.

Partridge himself is an outspoken atheist, who antagonizes many with his resolutely rational views. One of his few songs to garner overseas airplay recently was a tune from XTC's last album, Skylarking, called Dear God.

A sweet melody programmed by many radio managers who had not really absorbed its vicious denunciation of religion, it subsequently caused a storm of self-righteous censorship.

And as if all this angst wasn't sufficient to weigh down the shoulders of any contemporary poet, there are the standard insecurities of a mid-'30s writer, father and concerned-citizen-of-the-world to contend with.

"I feel what I do is so pathetically unimportant. For goodness sake, I'm dealing in three-minute pop songs and I play guitar. Come on!"

But last week, as Partridge conversed from his record company's Toronto office about XTC's acclaimed new album Oranges and Lemons, he belied all preconceptions of a moody, difficult, "artiste."

He expressed himself in beautifully literate language sprinkled with umpteen chuckles of a self-deprecating nature and gentle, thoughtful views of the human condition circa 1989.

He began by confirming that his, "repulsively optimistic," personality and the youthful buoyancy of the new album (despite its typically serious themes) can be directly traced to XTC's metamorphosis from a live to a strictly recording band.

"I feel a much happier person not to be prodded from van to hotel room to stage in front of 20,000 people. After five years it seemed like a prison sentence. We weren't growing musically, the music was bad on stage. Our health was suffering and we were being ripped off by managers and agents because we were out of sight. We weren't selling records because we were touring in the wrong places to make them a quick buck.

"And I was developing stage fright. I felt lonelier, more disturbed, until the point where I developed serious stomach pains and dizziness. I couldn't get off the bed to go to the show because my legs were paralyzed when I thought of standing in front of 15,000 people who wanted me to be wonderful. I didn't feel wonderful. I was a farting, sweaty, normal, balding, globby person."

Creatively, the liberation from the road has meant that, "the music has become technicolor. We went from the enforced order of bass and drums (so we'd be able to reproduce it on stage) to saying, 'Gosh, we can use bassoons, two drummers, a whole pallette of different colors.' "

Partridge's innate happiness is also a result of having time to father and raise two toddlers, Holly and Harry.

While Oranges and Lemons' underpinnings of nursery-rhyme cadence and soothing optimism is an accidental by- product of being surrounded by children, the refining of Partridge's vision of the universe is quite deliberately a message to the children of the world.

"I don't want to give them a fairy-tale that won't evaporate. I want them to grow up with the ability to investigate (for example) religion, which in my view is a man-made, idiot rationalization of the unrational.

"I realize there in no Holiday Inn in the sky. When I die what's inside the black body bag is going to be worm fodder. I'm not going to fly up and meet all my past relatives, I'm not going to be reincarnated.

"THIS is our one shot. If you're just biding your time, saying this doesn't matter, God will forgive me, you're just passing responsibility. You must be responsible for yourself. This is the one chance we get and we should be having a huge party. The big rule for me, is to be good to folks. They're just trying to have as much fun as you."


PARTRIDGE, William (d.1598), of Bridge, Kent.

This Member, presumably related to the Nicholas Partridge of Lenham who was well known in Continental reforming circles in the 1530s, was a minor Kent landowner, holding the manors of Patricksbourne, Kingston and Bridge in the Bekesbourne area, near Canterbury. Outside the county he owned a large house with other property in East Smithfield, valued at £10 a year. He must have owed his return to Parliament for Camelford to court patronage—perhaps to his ‘singular good master’ Sir William Cecil, who may have approached the 2nd Earl of Bedford on his behalf. Alternatively it is possible that Partridge, who had at one time been a servant of Sir Thomas Parry, may have known Bedford well enough to ask him directly for a seat. By 1572 he had been an official in Kent for some years, but again court rather than local influence probably accounts for his return. He sat on a legal committee 24 Feb. 1576. For the 1581 session he was, owing to his illness, replaced by Samuel Coxe, but at the end of the session (18 Mar.) the House reversed an earlier decision and ruled this substitution to have been out of order.3

Partridge was concerned with local administration in Kent for over 35 years, his duties including the supervision of grain supplies and the project for rebuilding Dover haven. He was also concerned with Kent boroughs, in June 1580 investigating the complaints made by foreigners living in Canterbury that the corporation was taxing them too heavily, and some years later joining the dean of Canterbury and others on a commission to inquire into the mayor’s action in imprisoning ‘certain gentlemen . bringing treasure from Sir Thomas Shirley [I]’. Following a threatened riot at Sandwich in June 1587, he went to the town to uphold the mayor’s authority and to send the ringleaders under guard to Canterbury. Four years later, when the Privy Council had lost patience with the factiousness and corruption of the New Romney corporation, he and other justices were ordered to inspect the town accounts and report generally.4

Some of his surviving letters on other topics are of interest. In December 1568 he petitioned (apparently unsuccessfully) to be allowed to farm the customs and impost on beer. Like other Kent gentlemen, he detested (Sir) Roger Manwood, writing to Burghley in April 1592 that Manwood was a ‘snake’, ‘as proud a man as ever I knew’, hardly able to abide equals, much less superiors, and given to revenge. As surveyor of ordnance—the office carried a salary of 2s. a day—Partridge was an official of the Tower, and as such he sat on commissions to deal with unruly warders and to see that the inhabitants of the Tower precincts provided the salary of a minister and paid their poor rate. In July 1595 he requested the appointment of a keeper of the stores there. The supply of munitions ‘rusts and cankers’ and the powder was kept in the ordnance office instead of in the vaults—a dangerous arrangement ‘if any chimney within the Tower should take fire, and sparks fly, or a flint stone strike fire’. ‘Her Majesty may better spare any officer in England, than lack a keeper of so weighty a charge’. In March 1596 he began a tour of inspection of all the castles and forts in the Cinque Ports: an undated report, sent to ‘Mr. Clapham at Court’ (presumably John Clapham) and enclosing the plan of a sea-coast fortification, probably refers to this journey.5

His will, made on 21 June 1598, the day of his death, was proved a fortnight later by his widow, the executrix and residuary legatee. To his son Edward, aged about 23, he left £200, in addition to money from timber sales and some non-entailed lands in Kent. A nephew, also Edward, received the London property and £100.6


Watch the video: Steve Partridge and Dave Schwan Bye Bye Love cover