USS Providence CL-82 - History

USS Providence CL-82 - History

USS Providence CL-82

Providence IV

(CL-82: dp. 13,755 (f.), 1. 610'1", b. 66'4", dr. 25', s. 32 k.

cpl. 992; a. 12 6", 12 5", 28 40mm., 10 20 mm., 2 catapults, GL Cleveland)

Providence (CL-82) was laid down 27 July 1943 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quiney, Mass., Iaunehed 28 December 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Mary Roberts, and commissioned 15 May 1945, Capt. W. B. Jackson in command.

Departing Boston 13 June 1945, Prov~denoe (CL 82) completed shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Upon arrival at Newport, R.I., 4 September, she trained prospective cruiser and carrier crews until 6 October.

Departing Boston in November, she visited Piraeus Greeee, in December, Istanbul with Missouri (BB-63) 5 to 9 April 1946, and Alexandria, Egypt, in May. Leaving the Mediterranean 16 June, she arrived at Philadelphia on the 25th. Following departure from the Delaware Capes in October and training out of Guantanamo Bay and Norfolk, Va., she left Hampton Roads for the Mediterranean 3 February 1947. After exercises and port visits in the Mediterranean she departed Athens, Greece' in May, and arrived at Boston later that month.

Departing Newport, R.I., in November she operated in the Mediterranean from 20 November 1947 to 2 March 1948 visiting Naples in December, Taranto in January, and Trieste and Venicee in February, returning to Newport in March Sailing from Newport in September 1948, she served the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean from 23 September 1948 to 14 January 1949, visiting Thessalonika in October, Marseilles in November, Trieste and Veniee in December, and Oran in January, returning to Newport later in January. She decommissioned at Boston 14 June 1949, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

Reclassified CLG-6 on 23 May 1957, Providence commenced=d conversion to a guided missile light cruiser at Boston in June 1957. Provided with modern missiles, command ship facilities and a nuclear weapons capability, she recommissioned 17 September 1959, Capt. Kenneth L. Veth in command. Following shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, she arrived at her new home port of Long Beach, Calif., 29 July 1960. After a six month tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, she returned to Long Beach 31 March 1961.

Following exercises off the west coast, she arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, in May 1962, and relieved Oklahoma City (CLW6) as flaghip of the 7th Fleet. During 1962 and 1963 she participated in 7th Fleet exercises. During a three day visit to Saigon in January 1964, she hosted South Vietnamese and American dignitaries, and delivered more than 38 tons of Projeet IIandelasp materials to local humanitarian organizations. Departing Yokosuka in July 1964, she returned to Long Beach in August. In October 1964 she began exercises in the Eastern Pacific. During January to June 1965, she received modern communications equipment. Spending the remainder of 1965 off the west coast with the 1st Fleet, she participated in exercises and visited various west coast ports.

Deployed to WestPac 12 November 1966, she again relieved Oklahoma City (CLW5) as flagship of the 7th Fleet on 1 December 1966 at Yokosuka, Japan. She contributed to a major bombardment of enemy positons in Vietnam 1 April 1967. She duelled with an enemy shore battery off the DMZ on 25 May. In July she provided gunfire support for amphibious operations. She bombarded enemy storage areas south of Da Nang 10 October.

During 1968, she provided gunfire support off Vietnam during each month except June and December. In February 1968, during the enemy's Tet offensive gunfire from Providence effceted an important breach in tie wall of an enemy strongpoint at Hue. During 1969 she operated with the 1st Fleet off the west coast. Into 1970 she remained active with the Pacific Fleet.


U.S.S. PROVIDENCE

The USS PROVIDENCE (CLG-6), a Cleveland class light cruiser, was commissioned on 15 MAY 1945 as CL-82. By the time she was worked up for deployment World War II had ended. PROVIDENCE deployed four times to the Mediterranean and was then decommissioned in 1949 and placed in reserve. From 1957 through 1959, PROVIDENCE underwent a conversion to CLG-6, a guided missile cruiser. Recommissioned on 17 September 1959, PROVIDENCE sailed to her homeport of Long Beach, California and then deployed to the Western Pacific in November of 1960. PROVIDENCE deployments to the Western Pacific continued throughout the 1960s and into the early 1970s, at times as the Flag Ship of Commander, 7th Fleet. She provided air defense and shore bombardment from off the coast of Vietnam. USS PROVIDENCE was decommissioned in August 1973 and subsequently scrapped in 1980. USS PROVIDENCE (CLG-6) served her country for 13 years, 11 months and 14 days, until decommissioned on 31 AUG 1973.

The USS PROVIDENCE (CLG-6) deployment history and significant events of her service career follow:


USS Providence CL-82 - History

1776

1778

1779

1945

May 15, 1945/ USS Providence CL82 commissioned.

She served as a Flag Ship in Mediterranean waters during the next four years, with three tours of duty as an operational unit of the SIXTH fleet.
June 13, 1945/ Departed Boston for Guantonamo Bay, Cuba . shakedown cruises.
September 2, 1945/ World War II ends with the formal
surrender of Japan aboard the U.S. battleship Missouri in Tokyo Bay.

WORLD WAR II HISTORY COMMEMORATION (CLICK HERE)
September 4th arrived at Newport, R.I. to train carrier and cruiser crews until October 6.
November 7, 1945: Providence leaves Boston for the Mediterranean.
November 17: After a rough Atlantic crossing just over nine days Providence arrives in Palermo, Sicily.
November 21: Providence departs for Naples.
November 22: Providence arrives in Naples.
Nov. - Dec. 1945: First ports included: hollow, hungry, war torn Palermo disheveled, bombed out Naples expensive, but striving Marseilles and Athens, hit hard, but refusing to take it lying down.

1946

Most of January, February, and March was spent in Naples but were fortunate in obtaining Rome trips.

Jan-Feb 1946: Visits to Capri and Rome, Italy

March 20, 1946: Nice, France

April 1946: Turkey and Beirut, Lebanon
April 5-9th: Istanbul with the battleship MISSOURI (BB63)
May 1946: Alexandria, Egypt Tangier, Algiers, Gibraltar
June 16, 1946: Departed the Mediterranean
June 25th: Arrived in Philadelphia
Oct. - Feb.: Departed from the Delaware Capes and participated in training exercises out of Guantanamo Bay and Norfolk, Va.
1947
February 3: Departed Hampton Roads for the Mediterranean .
May: Departed Athens, Greece for Boston, MA. after port visits and exercises.
November: Departing Newport, R.I.
Nov. - Dec.: Operations in the Mediterranean

1948

September 23, 1948 to January 14, 1949: Served the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean

March: Returning to Newport, Rhode Island.

1949

June 14: Providence decommissioned at Boston, MA and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

Direct American involvement in Vietnam began in 1955 with the arrival of the first advisors.

1956

1957

1958

1959

USS Providence CLG-6 recommissioned 17 September 1959 as a light guided missile cruiser. Capt. Kenneth L. Veth in command.

1960

1961

1962

Following exercises off the west coast, she arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, in May 1962, and relieved OKLAHOMA CITY (CLG-5) as flagship of the 7th Fleet.


1963

1964

Departing Yokosuka in July 1964, Providence returned to Long Beach in August. In October 1964, she began exercises in the Eastern Pacific.

On August 4, 1964, the American destroyers MADDOX and TURNER JOY were attacked by North Vietnamese patrol boats in the international waters of the Gulf of Tonkin.

CONSTELLATION, visiting Hong Kong on a regularly-scheduled port visit, set sail immediately and began launching strikes against North Vietnamese vessels and bases.
Aug. 4, 1964 - Aircraft from USS Ticonderoga (CVA 14) drove off North Vietnamese motor torpedoboats attacking the destroyer USS Maddox, patrolling international waters in the Gulf of Tonkin. Aug. 5, 1964 - On order from President Lyndon B. Johnson, aircraft from USS Constellation (CVA 64)and USS Ticonderoga (CVA 14) attacked motor torpedo boats and their supporting at five locations along the North Vietnam coast. In 64 attack sorties, these aircraft sank or seriously damaged 25 boats and destroyed a major part of their petroleum stores and storage facilities.

August 5, 1964: The Tonkin Gulf Incident: 1964. President Johnson's Message to Congress :

"Last night I announced to the American people that the North Vietnamese regime had conducted further deliberate attacks against U.S. naval vessels operating in international waters, and I had therefore directed air action against gunboats and supporting facilities used in these hostile operations. This air action has now been carried out with substantial damage to the boats and facilities. Two U.S. aircraft were lost in the action. These latest actions of the North Vietnamese regime has given a new and grave turn to the already serious situation in southeast Asia.

We must make it clear to all that the United States is united
in its determination to bring about the end of Communist subversion and aggression in the area. ".

1965

The first combat troops arrived in 1965.

Providence spent the remainder of 1965 off the west coast with the 1st Fleet participated in exercises and visited various west coast ports.

1966

Providence deployed to WestPac 12 November 1966.

She again relieved OKLAHOMA CITY as flagship of the 7th Fleet on 1 December 1966 at Yokosuka, Japan.

1967

Providence contributed to a major bombardment of enemy positions in Vietnam 1 April 1967.

She dueled with an enemy shore battery off the DMZ on 25 May 1967.

In July 1967, Providence provided gunfire support for amphibious operations.

She bombarded enemy storage areas south of Da Nang 10 October 1967.

1968

During 1968, Providence provided gunfire support off Vietnam during each month except June and December.

In February 1968, during the enemy's Tet offensive, gunfire from PROVIDENCE effected an important breach in the wall of an enemy strong point at Hue.

Providence took rounds from shore around 4 July '68 and more times not recorded.

Tet, 1968 The massive enemy offensive at the lunar new year decimated the Vietcong and failed to topple the Saigon government but led to the beginning of America's military withdrawal from Vietnam.

1969


During 1969 Providence operated with the 1st Fleet off the west coast.

1970

1971


Rear Admiral Rembrant C. Robinson assumes position of Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Flotilla Eleven in a special ceremony on board USS Truxtun (DLGN-35) at pier side Subic Bay.

1972 .


Vietnam War on the steady decline for U.S. forces, but the U.S. Navy still had a role.

In April 1972, the U.S. 7th Fleet on Yankee Station was still busy providing support for ground forces.

Cruisers and Destroyers continued to pour rounds on invading enemy divisions.

President Richard Nixon had ordered aerial and naval bombardments to resume over North Vietnam in
response to the NVA offensive in the South.

Six carriers -- the Constellation, Kitty Hawk, Hancock, Coral Sea, Saratoga and the Midway -- all joined in Operation Freedom Train. Aircraft from these vessels struck military and logistical targets in Dong Hoi, Vinh, Thanh Hoa, Haiphong and Hanoi.

The cruiser USS Oklahoma City and three destroyers trained their guns on the Do Son Peninsula, a small strip of land guarding the approaches to Haiphong. The destroyers Joseph Strauss and Richard B. Anderson hit the Ben Hai Bridge in the northern section of the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone).

NVA shore batteries on April 17th, struck the destroyer USS Buchanan , killing one sailor and wounding seven others.

On April 19th, the destroyer USS Higbee was hit by a bomb. A MiG aircraft had dropped a bomb on the vessel's stern, wounding four sailors.

On April 19th, the missile frigate USS Sterett scored one hit when it downed a MiG with a Terrier missile
near Dong Hoi. Earlier in March, she bagged two more enemy planes. FTCS J.F. (Charlie) Brown (formerly of the USS Providence) had the honor of pulling the trigger.

In May, the USS Chicago (CG-11), a cruiser patrolling off the coast of North Vietnam, spotted an unidentified aircraft. The ship immediately launched a Talos surface-to-air missile, which knocked the plane out of the sky. The Chicago was credited with shooting down a MIG. The cruiser, USS Providence also participated in this May campaign in the Tonkin Gulf.

Raid on Haiphong Harbor (10 May, 1972) included the cruisers USS Oklahoma City, USS Providence, USS Newport News, and two destroyers USS Buchanan and USS Hanson The first multi-cruiser strike since WWII lasted about 15 minutes.



Also in May, F-4 pilot Lt. Randall J. Cunningham, today a congressman from California, together with Lt. (j.g.) William Driscoll, his electronics warfare officer, shot down five MiGs, three on May 10. Flying off the carrier USS Constellation, they became the first and only Navy aces of the Vietnam War.

Naval aviators downed 59 MiGs in Vietnam: 23 between May 6, 1972, and Jan. 12, 1973.

During this time, A-6 Intruders from the carrier USS Coral Sea dropped magnetic-acoustic sea mines around Haiphong Harbor to block the flow of supplies into North Vietnam.

From May until December 1972, no large supply ships entered the Communist harbors. Smaller boats attempting to run the blockade were intercepted by Navy ships.

Two NVA PT boats were destroyed in August by the destroyer USS Rowan and the cruiser USS Newport News while the USS Providence was engaged in a night shelling of Haiphong Harbor.

Oct. 11, 20 sailors aboard the USS Newport News were killed and 37 injured in an explosion caused by a malfunctioning 8-inch gun turret during a fire support mission.

From April through September 1972, the cruiser-destroyer group fired over 111,000 rounds. Besides
destroying vehicles, artillery, tanks, coastal logistical craft and PT boats, the barrage killed an estimated 2,000 NVA.

By mid-1972, Navy personnel in Vietnam numbered 2,340 -- after peaking at 39,265 in October 1968.

1973

Cease-fire of January 1973.

Operation End Sweep's Task Force 78 cleared mines from North Vietnam's waters from February 6th to July 18th. Two minesweeping helicopters were lost in accidents.

Naval Forces Vietnam/Naval Advisory Group ceased activities March 29, 1973.

August 31, 1973

Decommissioning Ceremony of USS Providence

1974
1975

North Vietnamese tanks smashed into Saigon on April 30, 1975, and the long war ended with South Vietnam's surrender.

1976
1977

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USS Providence Veterans Recall Operation Lion’s Den

Cruiser USS PROVIDENCE (CLG 6) in an undated photo. NHHC L-File Collection.

The Foundation has been busily occupied preparing the new exhibit “Into the Lion’s Den” for the Cold War Gallery, and on Thursday, 3 May, we were reminded of the reason we strive to build such exhibits in the first place. The National Navy Museum and the Cold War Gallery were honored by a visit from approximately 60 members of the USS Providence (CL 82/CLG 6) reunion group. Amongst the group were two sailors who were on board Providence the night of the pitched battle in Haiphong Harbor: Gary Cheever and Ken Chambers. For those unfamiliar with the exhibit, it centers around a 1972 nighttime raid by four surface warships of the U.S. Navy deep into enemy waters. The ships successfully bombarded enemy shore positions, and with the assistance of A-7 Corsair II aircraft, fended off a counterattack by North Vietnamese torpedo boats.

The Providence veterans were in town for their annual reunion, and one of the many items on their busy itinerary was a visit to the Washington Navy Yard and the Navy Museum. Early on the afternoon of 3 May, they crowded into the Cold War Gallery, and circled around the Foundation’s Dr. Dave Winkler, who gave them a brief history of the Washington Navy Yard, and explained the reasons behind the development of the Cold War Gallery. After descriptions of the Trident I C4 missile at the Gallery’s entrance, the Ready Room Theater, and the Covert Submarine Operations exhibit, Winkler described the basics of the new Lion’s Den exhibit. It quickly became apparent that two veterans of the battle were in the crowd, and Winkler asked if they wanted to share their experiences. Gary Cheever observed the battle from the vantage point of the bridge, and he offered to speak briefly to the gathered crowd. Following his remarks, we were lucky enough to speak to both Cheever and Chambers.

Gary Cheever (center, with hat and glasses, turned to his left) speaks to the gathered crowd about Operation Lion's Den

Gary Cheever retired from the U.S. Army as a Lieutenant Colonel, but in 1972 he was a seaman on board the cruiser USS Providence as she steamed towards Haiphong Harbor. The evening of the battle, he was serving as Duty Corpsman on bridge . He watched as the cruiser steamed in formation behind USS Newport News (CA 148) at high speed approaching the harbor. He felt the ship vibrating, as her powerful engines pushed her through the dark water. As they entered the harbor they began a long, u-shaped turn, heading into the narrow harbor, towards their enemy targets ashore. The ship leaned noticeably in the high speed turn, and Cheever felt like the port screw at times was close to the surface of the water, causing the vibration that he felt. All was dark and silent until, according to Cheever, “it seemed like the order to fire was given at the same time for all our ships, I saw that our 6 inch guns were fully depressed, and the next thing I know it was like daylight outside.” He could see enemy shore batteries firing back, using what appeared to be anti-aircraft guns. He was outfitted with a flak jacket and helmet, but when enemy .50 caliber rounds began striking the exterior of the bridge, he ducked for safety behind a bulkhead, peeking out for views through a porthole. Providence steamed at full speed throughout the entire bombardment mission, and consequently Cheever recalls that the strike was over rather quickly.

Ken Chambers in the Cold War Gallery (model of USS NORTHAMPTON in background) just a few yards from the location of the upcoming "Into the Lion's Den" exhibit

Ken Chambers was stationed in the Emergency Diesel Compartment on board Providence on the night of the battle. While he couldn’t see what was going on outside the ship in Haiphong Harbor, sounds and vibrations told him all he needed to know. As they approached the harbor, Chambers “felt the shafts speeding up, and I knew something was going on.” Fortunately for those below wondering what was going on, without a porthole to gaze out through, the communications system had been patched into the ship’s PA. Sailors throughout the ship could hear their shipmates navigating the Providence and directing fire on the enemy. The ship began shelling shore positions, and Chambers could hear enemy rounds striking the water around them.

We were thrilled to have a brief chance to speak to these two Operation Lion’s Den veterans, and to welcome all of the Providence veterans to the Cold War Gallery. If you’d like to learn more about the new exhibit remembering this daring night raid behind enemy lines, please visit our Fundly page, and consider making a donation to support its construction.

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71 Comments

I was there. USS Providence smoke watch between the stacks of fore and aft firerooms. As said, what a night. Lots of water spouts between CLG 6 and screening destroyer. Didn’t know 50 cal fire was received, thought air burst.

I was on starboard watch when The Hilo went down l will never foget terrible night that was things like that stay in your mind forever

I remember the night well, I was loading powder shells in the 5 inch gun turret. It would be great to hear from any of the members of the MARINE DETACHMENT or MEMBERS of the crew, or Capt. Gibbons. If any more ribbons were awarded after that night, please let me know, as I was sent home on a emergency Red Cross leave when we docked in San Diego, My 26 year old sister and 3 month old god child, had been Murdered back home! Any replies are more then welcome. SEMPER FI GUYS , CPL.Joseph C. Mallo U.S.M.C.

Mallo,
My name back then was Seaman Alvarez. I was attached to the Boatswain division. I took was loading but in the six in gun turret. I remember you hanging with the Chicano crowd and playing cards at night. I too remember when that helo went down killing that officer and crew. I too will never forget.
I remember another marine by the name of Polfaol (in sound only). Don’t know if he was aboard during that mission or came after you left. Anyway glad to see your comment. God bless.

Alvarez. Now that is a familiar name. Seaman Bagley. Do you have any attachments to Roberto Perez or Saunders? Hey like to stay in touch with you and all if can .we were a pretty good team of guys.

I remember you well my friend. Do you ever hear from Perez or Gurerro?

Alvarez, perhaps you may remember me. I came aboard Prov during decommission in 󈨍. We hung out at the barracks on base (San Diego). You had a brother in the Marines I recall. You and another guy used to reenact a story about fighting the “g..ks” overseas. You should look into signing up for membership at USS Providence.org. God Bless you and yours.

I remember you. Your right, I did have a brother that was a Marine who would come up to party in San Diego with me and my buds. He used to stay over night at the barracks every time he came. Thought we would get in trouble but never did. All the guys at the barracks like him so it was OK. I sure like hearing from a shipmate like you. Hope you have found smooth sailing in your life. I’m retired and live in El Paso, Tx. Take care.

My husband was on the ship when the helicopter went down…his name is Edward Borrero

hello, tell ed allan warrell said hello. we hung out together

I was in g.q.station aft high sky that night.

AI as a watertender 3rd class on the uss providene when it was put into commision.
We went to Cuba from Boston came back to boston then was headed for the South Pacific and to 2 days out of Cuba the droped the A bomb and the war was over. We went back to boston for a short time ant then went to Europe for 8 months and was dischared from there..
Cecil C, Mc Laughlin

I was the Electricial phone talker in main control during the raid. My dad sent me a newspaper clipping from the Indianaplois star telling about the raid.

I was a yeoman that served on board the USS PROVIDENCE (CLG 6) the night
Rear Admiral Rembrandt C. Robinson, USN was killed. I worked in the Captains
office. The Admiral was the first Flag Officer to be killed in the Viet-Nam Conflict.
I served with a lot of great men. I really miss all those I served with.

The only Flag Officer to die in that war. I was onboard that night too. Can’t forget it.

Hey Glynn, I remember you being part of the X Division gang and keeping the library in order. You had quite a knack for getting the word out and about the mess deck. You are the only guy I ever knew who was serious enough to write a letter to the President of the U.S.

I “worked” with you typing on the magnetic type selectric typewriter.

I remember you and Paul Redcloud giving SP hell, and your broken arrow. You had the Chaplin thinking you were a saint.

Glynn Crooks..Native Brother..how are you, I was in 2nd Division, Lifeboats. Yes, remember loss of Admiral that night, we had a lot of boats in the water, ship lit up. Exciting ride to Haiphong next night, again in August! Hope all ok with you.

Ronald Homewytewa SN
was Ronald Homer during my Navy hitch, changed back to my traditional name in 1982.

Hey Glynn, I was on the USS Providence back then with you.
I was a PHAN in X Division when we made this trip. Not a day goes by that I don’t remember all the things that happened while we were out and a lot of the great guys I served with. It is great to see some of you posting here after all these years.. Wow 48 years, We were all so young and indestructible back then..

I was there that night at my station in 6 inch gun turret. I was the right gun projectile man. We could not see what was going on from inside. When we came out after it was over the deck of the ship was covered with brass powder casings. I was a seaman in the 1ST div. I also was the swimmer for 1St div. that night we lost the Admiral

3rd class GMG and left gun captain in the 6″ turret. Was hot work that night and many others. While concerned about enemy fire I felt it more likely that any causalities would be from a gun malfunction. Hang fires, jammed breach block with projectile in a hot barrel, over heated recoil system, faulty projectile fuse seal, etc.
On a side note the 3 guns were Left, Center and Right. Someone had named them after women so they had their names painted on them, Linda, Cindy, Rose. My first wife was name Cindy, and my second/current wife is name Linda. Have yet to meet Rose.

Hi Jon, its Tim Wilburns (animal!) How you doing after all these years

Reynolds does the name seaman Bagley rings bell?

I was also with the Marine Detachment. I would have been in the 5 inch gun mount, working in the handling room just below the gun mount. I don’t remember the night very well, they all seem to run together.
I stayed on the Providence until it returned to San Diego and was decommissioned. I was then reassigned to an aircraft carrier and went back to Vietnam for another year.
I would have most likely been a Lance Corporal at the time.
Norm Neifert, “Semper Fi.”

I was there with you norm,Larry Williams, l/cpl also. Worked upper handling room during the raids. Was missile house watch when we lost the helo. I retired a gunny,made 1st shirt in desert storm but retired before being pined. Any body here from ssgt able or willie.

I was onboard Providence in IFDS, Integrated Flagship Data System, on that August night. The majority of the crew only had a hint that something was going down that night when they went through the chow line and Steak and Lobster was being served. Within hours the crew knew what the basic plan was. What I do know from that night is that what I experienced is and has been vividly recorded in my memory. When flag called down to us in IFDS for the latest info on the ‘Mine Fields’ we all knew that this night was going to be very different and no cake walk. With general quarters solidly set it began. We were told that we were third ship in line entering Haiphong Harbor, two destroyers in front of us and one destroyer aft since the only significant armament aft was our Surf-Air Missiles. Providence shuddered as she increased speed and she listed significantly port then starboard multiple times negotiating turns as she navigated the ‘Mine Fiedls’ and then the command to fire occurred and when it was over the Providence had very little 6 inch and 5 inch ammunition left in her magazines. Hours afterward we were at a reduced general quarters when our captain said that we were very successful at the mission and congratulations were coming from the highest authority and command but because of the nature of the mission that the world would probably not hear about the mission for quite sometime. I still wonder to this day why all crews have not been recognized for ‘Lions Den’ with a Medal/Award. Does anyone know differently ? I gratefully thank all my fellow brothers-in-arms for their service and professionalism, especially on that August night in 1972. – See more at: www.navyhistory.org/2012/03/interview-admiral-holloway-operation-lions-den/#comment-122380

Hey Howard,
How are you? I was there, a long time ago…remember it well….I thought we lost power in the harbor and several patrol boats were headed out way when they fired the ship up?
Hope you are well and good!
I left San Diego in 1998 – Live in Vegas

DP1 Westney,
I was a DP3 when when we brought the computer center aboard Providence. I had been stationed at NELC (Battery Humphrey, end of Point Loma, under the lighthouse) developing the systems capabilities when it was time for orders. My chief said I could go with him aboard Providence or enjoy an oiler in the Indian Ocean. I went with the chief. I got out May 󈨋, DP2. Good duty, good memories and excellent preparation for my civilian career…
The most exciting event during my time aboard was the 1971 Sylmar earthquake. Providence was tied up at Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach when the ‘quake struck…

Those Gunners mates and gun crews did some fine work that night. Breach open Bore Clear, No casualties.

I too was a seaman on board the USS Providence for this spectacular event. A time in my life I will never forget, the blazing fire from the ships gun barrels and the thunderous noise of the raging battle. I was a seaman at the time attached to the Executive Division, Captain’s office, but working in many areas throughout the ship during GQ, whether in CIC, the gun turrets, or working on a fire team to fill in the gaps where personnel were needed. I will never forget the crew of the Providence, and the bond that was formed during that time in our lives. I retired from the Navy in 1993 and still live in San Diego, CA very close to the Naval Station. I would love to hear from anyone of the crew members who served on board Providence during that cruise.

I was at my GQ station in the passageway behind the 5 inch 54 gun mount. Me and another shipmate stepped out on the port side to watch “the shit hit the fan”. For an FA with no experience, that was a huge wake up call! Then the long days and nights rearming and refueling. Carried a ton of 5 inch on the working parties. After we returned to San Diego, I was on the decommissioning crew and sadly took her apart to be mothballed.

Jerry, I worked with you in MTST. I have never forgotten your humor.

I was on board during that period and often thought on the “impressive teamwork and camaraderie”. I would like to reunite.

I was a CT who volunteered to go aboard on 24 hours notice in San Diego and did the entire cruise. I was assigned to Admiral Robinson’s staff although I rarely saw him. I did contact one of his sons several years ago and mailed him my cruise book which was dedicated to Admiral Robinson, Captain Taylor and Commander Leaver.

Haiphong Harbor was one of the more intense nights.

Al
This is Z , I to was a CT who served with you. Would like to get in touch.
I remember the night well when the helicopter went into the water. Then the night in Haiphong Harbor very intense with the ship rocking.

I am looking for someone named D.H Renz who I have seen a photo of from the 1st Div. in the 󈨀-󈨁 cruise book that someone sent me. He was a Gunners Mate 3rd class in the photo. He was aboard the U.S.S. Providence. There is something about Turret One with him as well. I have something of his and would like to locate him, and or a family member to see if they would be interested in having it. Any information would be helpful. I have no D.O.B or even what his initials stand for.

Center gun captain, during all of this, only almost 19 years old was asked to cool a hot gun 5󉐒 with two other seaman on one of those nights, we lived .

I was assigned to third division for my entire tour, even though I had graduated from gunnery school, but was made center gun captain, and after 12 hours in the guns, 6 on 6 off I had to work 6 hours with the deck crew. Speak of an injustice. But those where the times

This is Wilburn. One of the other two men.

SMSN La Mere, yessir, quite a night, especially from the signal bridge. God bless us all

I was very proud to be a part of Operation Linebacker. We had a ship of very good men and I’m honored to call each and every one of them friend.

I was on the Providence CLG-6 at the time. Operation Lion’s Den was embedded into every sailor’s memory, I know it is in mine until the end of my life.

Over the years I have thought of you and how disciplined you were and dedicated to the cause. You provide the direction I needed. Not sure where you are living now but I am in PA and perhaps we can reconnect. Take care

Phil, I’m in North West Arkansas, I’d love to see you too. We had the best guys in the fleet.

Bill.
I always have fond memories of our teamwork together. You were a dedicated hard ass but most dedicated needed to ensure our survival you can reach me at [email protected] Phil Schommer. Lets meet in your home town soon

Just like my buddy Bill Enderland said, that night is embedded in all our minds.
I was Petty Officer in charge of the 6″ shell deck that night and we sent a bunch of
rounds up there in a hurry. She was running wide open and leaning to starboard
and it was hard to stand up for a while. I had some good guys in there with me and
all did a great job. Yes there is still a lot of brass at the bottom of the Gulf of Tonkin and the South China Sea.

Jack went on to be successful in life, as did most of the men on the Providence. There was an attitude of “Keep moving forward”. On a sad note, Donald Greenaway BM-1, LPO of third division passed away from colon cancer the 9th of November of 2015. As they said in the song “Big John”………at the bottom of this mine lies a big, big man.

I am so so so sorry to hear the Donald Greenway passed in the recent months. It has been so so many years since we have all been contacted . I would like to extend my support for all of us that experience that period of Haiphong Harbor on the USS Providence. A GREAT ship and a GREAT crew, By best to everyone and let’s try to organize a reunion

So sorry to hear about the passing of Donald Greenaway. He was my first supervisor when I reported aboard USS Providence at age 17. Donald was very inspirational to this rookie kid fresh out of boot camp. I will always remember is his strong spirit and salty lingo…Rest in peace my friend!

Jack your tireless quick witted sense of humor and the many pranks you pulled help make a tough time entertaining. You got the best of Golieb on
many occasions.

I was on throttle 3 aft engine room during that run . watchin that steam gauge as we rolled out at flank

I was there that night. In main battery plot on the stable vertical actually firing the 6 inch guns.We gave them heck that night.

Remembrance:
Smoking lamp was out, all white lights were off, only red light could be used throughout the ship. We were getting close to our destination in the Tonkin Gulf. (As per John Bunn, we were close to the Chinese Island of Hainan) It appeared that helos were landing on the fantail and dropping off personal for planning in the war room or CIC. This mission included a number of ships of the 7th fleet.

That night it happened, a helo returning from the USS Coral Sea that was trying to land on the fantail touched down to close to the edge of the ship and plunged over the starboard side with the whole crew. It sunk like a rock. I understand there were no survivors. (Don Greenaway indicates that three (3) crewmembers were rescued and that the Rear Admiral and his staff died). I remember approximately 6 small boats in the water in a slow quiet search in the dark with only red lights illuminating the sea. Providence was just floating lifeless on the sea as the search continued for several hours. I could sense our vulnerability in the water as we were in enemy waters, but a thorough search was made just the same. It was cold that night, the search seemed to last a long time you could barely make out the small boats under red lights. They had on those hard hats and life jackets with their eyes to the water.

Hours later, we were underway again to Haiphong Harbor on our mission. As we got closer I remember seeing bright lights flickering and glowing in the distance. It looked beautiful as if someone were celebrating a 4th of July or something of that sort. Then I was enlightened that shore guns were firing at the ship and that we were out of range at this time. We were approaching our target off Haiphong Harbor. It was reality time, (10 May 1972) I was on a ship somewhere off north Vietnam and it was time for general quarters.

I was down in the computer room for GQ and soon could hear rocks being thrown against the hull of the ship and soon realized that it was shrapnel from exploding projectiles. I understand we made a few assaults on the mainland and inflicted good damage. All the ships then left the area quickly till we reached safe waters. The ship was vibrating from the engine and prop noise as we steamed away. It was hard to get good info on this happening for it seems that info is given on a need to know basis.
Sam Villa Ftm-3

by the way shipmate Rear Admiral Robinson and two of his staff died in the helo crash on the night of May 08, 1972 two nights before the May 10th raid on the Do Song Peninsula, Haiphong Harbor.

I was there that night also, on the bridge with flak jacket and helmet on just like all the other GQ’s. Linebacker ops were very busy, doing 3 raids up the coast just about every night and rearming out to sea, vert reps etc. I was on the bridge on sound powered phone to CIC. It was wild for a few minutes that seemed forever. I was in CIC listening in on the conversation the air controller was having with the crew of the Helo when it went down…….Sheer shock. I had wanted to do air controlling up to that point. My rate was Radarman. RDSN I served on Providence August 71-June 73. I also was on the decom team……..very sad to see our mother being taken apart.

I to was on the USS Providence

It’s been years 1972, would like to reunite

I was a Gun Fire Control Tech. 3rd class on Providence and I was at my GQ station in the 6 inch gun director during the Haiphong Harbor raid. I was at my director trainer position and was radar tracking a shore reference point. The reference was fed to the Mark 48 fire control computer for firing solutions. I remember we were really Rockin’ and Rollin” with all guns that night. I do also remember the big fear was the possibility of the ship becoming disabled by enemy fire or a mechanical issue. We would have to perform a rescue or tow under the noses of the North Vietnamese ! Thankfully the Providence ran like a Swiss Watch. The old Cleveland class Cruisers were some quality American ships built by “The Greatest Generation”. My fellow FTs were a class bunch of professionals even though we were basically kids at the time.

27 Aug 󈨌 Newport News along with Providence, Rowan and Robison entered into the Lion’s Den to strike at designated targets near Cat Bi Island, North Vietnam. All went as planned until the Task Group started to withdraw. Radar detected several PT boats in attack formation approaching Newport News. Many eight, five and three inch rounds were fired, the first salvo removing one PT from the battle. Soon after a second PT began to burn, and the crew appeared to transfer to the third PT. All the while the PT boats pressed the Newport News closer to the mine field restricting our ability to maneuver. As Newport News made for sea the final PT was seen to be burning in the distance. As stated by crew members of Providence many rounds of hostile fire was received both air burst and water burst. At my GQ station in Forward Gyro, I could hear the clanging of steel against the hull and every so often, the muffled explosion of a close call. Ranges to the PT boats, given by the Lookouts, were often less than one mile, well within torpedo range. Admiral Hollaway, in his U-Tube sea story, gives all the credit for the destruction of the PT boats to Naval Air, but the recording that I made of the attack, described by the lookouts, does not mention the air support until they came to finish off the final burning PT. A Providence officer posted a very descriptive depiction of the entire attack. By the way Rowan supported Newport News, and did a very heroic maneuver when they steamed between the Newport News and the possible torpedo launched from the third PT. The Navy Unit Commendation presented to Newport News gives credit to Her and Rowan for the destruction of one PT and the damage of two others, no mention of Naval Air support. Providence, Rowan, Robison and the Newport News made history that night, but as history goes, very few knew and even less care. Fair Winds and Following Seas.

I was a FTM2 in Weapons Control on top of the missile house. I remember the sounds, while sitting on a radar scope. When we departed the raid, the radar screen went white from all the jamming. Out of range, OIC of weps control sent me to after con to check on the 22 men not answering the sound powered phone circuits. They were all missing. Not a trace of 22 men. I looked around for several minutes, then checked the barbette of the SPQ-5 radar. inside were the missing men, with the flak jackets and helmets arranged to cover them. I returned to WEPS Control to report to the CDR. It released all the tension and we all got a good laugh out of it. NOTE: One Purple Heart earned on this raid. A Marine 2LT got a scratch on his neck when an airburst knocked his night vision mount over on top of director 2. He was embarrassed. NOTE 2: The published maximum firing rate for a dual gun Mk38 Mod 5, 5″ was 15 rounds/gun/minute. The first minute they sent 32 rounds, the second was 31, the third was 30. 9 minutes later, they were still sending 28 rounds/minute. OORAH

I was reading all the previous USS PROVIDENCE,(CLG-6) crewmembers recalls of the NIGHT of MAY 10th, 1972 concerning the raid on the DO SONG PENINSULA @ 0345 HOURS, firing course was 240T a parallel to the longitudinal axis of the CAT BI AIRFIELD.
I was an RM2 assigned to the USS Providence, CLG-6 in San Diego, California @ North Island Naval Air Station. We h ad 1st Fleet Flag onboard. On a Friday Mid watch that ran from 2300hours Friday Night to 0700 Saturday Morning I received over the fleet broadcast communications a Top Secret Message(encrypted) CINCPAC. When the on duty communications officer and I decrypted it, it gave USS Providence, CLG-6 orders to get underway on the following Tuesday Morning for Southeast Asia. Plus the orders for 1st Fleet to disembark to another ship in San Diego Harbor.
Now concerning the events that took place on the evenings of May 8th and May 10th, 1972 is as follows according to my recollections of the events that took place on those nights. On the night of May 8th, 1972 @ approximately 2245hours when I and my radio crew just came on watch the 1MC came on alarming the ship of a man overboard and later changed to a helo crash portside. Rear Admiral R.C. Robinson, Commander of Cruiser Destroyer Force Vietnam and his staff of Captain Taylor and Commander Leaver where killed in the helo crash. The only member of his staff to survive was Commander McCulloch and the entire helicopter crew. That threw everything into concern about the coming/scheduled gun cruiser raid scheduled for May 10th on the Do Song Peninsula. The raid went on as scheduled 0345HOURS and well I know because I again with the crew where again on mid watch in the radio shack and you could definitely hear the 152mm shells from the North Vietnamese hitting the waters around us with a thump. This was my 4th and final deployment to Vietnam. My first deployment to Vietnam I was an HM3 Medical Laboratory Technician was in 1966 on the USS REPOSE’S(AH-16)’s initial deployment right in close on the coast of Vietnam for 13 months, next was in 1968 on the USS BEXAR, (APA/LPA-237), as an HM2, Medical Laboratory Technician, my third tour as an RM2 was aboard the USS OUTAGAMIE COUNTY,( LST-1073 )(for approximately 6 months putting her out commission in Orange, Texas, INACTSHIPFAC, than to the USS PRPOVIDENCE, (CLG-6). Retired from the NAVY on August 31, 1981.
In civilian life after retiring from the NAVY I attend North Dakota State University(NDSU) in Fargo, North Dakota where I received my Registered Nursing Degree. I retired from the US Postal Service as their Occupational Health Nurse for the ,Dakotas District, which includes North and South Dakotas and Northwest Minnesota.

i also remember that night,and the helo rolling off deck and tearing into our sleeping quarters.

I was an RM2 aboard USS Providence, CLG6 that night and I see some exaggerated story telling. I was the one on duty aboard Providence in San Diego, California @ North Island Naval Station in the radio shack that Friday Night as the petty officer of the watch when the ship received a top secret encrypted message from CINCPAC that gave orders to pull out on Tuesday morning for WESPAC. I had TOP SECRET CLEARANCE, so know what and where we were going. I was also on duty in the radio shack the night of May 8th, 1972 when at 2245 Hours Rear Admiral R.C. Robinson and staff of Captain Taylor and Commander Leaver where killed in a helicopter crash off the fantail of the PROVIDENCE. After this there was some hesitation as to whether we would continue with the operation because of this high level loss of life. I was also on duty when we commenced the attack on May 10, 1972, @ 0347 hours on the Do Son Peninsula. This is fact not story telling and I’d been to Vietnam twice before on the USS Repose, AH-16 (1966) and the USS BEXAR, APA/LPA-237 (1968) I was a HM2 Medical Laboratory Technician than. TheDo Song Peninsula Raid was a hairy but short experience. Currently I am a RETIRED RN/BSN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH NURSE ADMINISTRATOR for the US Postal S ervice’s Dakotas District that encompasses NORTH and SOUTH DAKOTA, NORTHWEST MINNESOTA and Montana. I am retired as I have stated previously and reside here in SIOUX FALLS, SOUTH DAKOTA.

Bill Dunn: SM2 served on CLG 6. Was there that night. Was outside giving info to captain on in coming boats and rounds. Was scary, but we did our jobs. Signal men were always outside on all raids. We saw it all.

I Was on the Providence Got there In Oct 72. I was in 1st Division . Helped with the Decommissioning. I saw her a lot while she was in Bremerton WA Ship yard in Mothballs . I just want to say A friend Gary Ulmer passed away he also served on the Providence From 1971 to 1973 .

I was in the superstructure that night with about seven people. That was my general quarters station. The fact that I was only 18 and really had no idea what was going on was amazing. I was a recorder. What was I supposed to record?
No one knew. I think that a lot of 18 year olds on that ship were in the same boat. (no pun intended) Made a lot of good friends during that tour. Still keep in touch with Wallace from the print shop. John Cochrane sadly passed away quite awhile ago. We were shipmates. That bond never dies.

BT Olsen was there for all too. 1970/1973, remember 6 inch guns firing like machine gun, after event headed to Philippines to rebarrel. Helicopter crash, on duty in boiler room went from full to all stop, be on boiler front for that. Any one remember the six hundred cases of beer and giving a six pack getting in liberty launch in Indian Ocean?

I was in CIC on the surface scope and remember hearing shrapnel bounce off the side of the ship, I didn’t know what it was and asked what it was, my butt hole puckered when they told me.

I was normally 6-on-6-off in the 5″ gun mount, but during the raid I wasn’t and as a PH3 I was taking photos during the raid and pretty sure I have the only photo of the raid which is of the Oklahoma City silouetted by here guns.


USS Providence CL-82 (CLG-6)

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This photo of USS Providence CL 82 is exactly as you see it with the matte printed around it. You will have the choice of two print sizes, either 8″x 10″ or 11″x 14″. The print will be ready for framing, or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing then you can mount it in a larger frame. Your personalized print will look awesome when you frame it.

We can PERSONALIZE your print of the USS Providence CL 82 with your name, rank and years served and there is NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE for this option. After you place your order you can simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed. For example:

United States Navy Sailor
YOUR NAME HERE
Proudly Served: Your Years Here

This would make a nice gift for yourself or that special Navy veteran you may know, therefore, it would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

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The USS Providence CL 82 photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high-resolution printer and should last many years. The unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. Most sailors loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had a tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older, the appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience will get stronger. The personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. When you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart.

We have been in business since 2005 and our reputation for having great products and customer satisfaction is indeed exceptional. You will, therefore, enjoy this product guaranteed.


USS Providence CL-82 - History


Light Cruiser, CL-82: Displacement 13,755 (full load)

Length 610' 1"
Beam 66' 4"
Draft 25'
Speed 32 knots
Complement 992

Armament 12 6", 12 5", 28 40 millimeter, 10 20 millimeter, 2 catapults

Providence (CL-82) was laid down 27 July 1943 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass. launched 28 December 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Mary Roberts and commissioned 15 May 1945, Capt. W. B. Jackson in command.

Powerful New Cruiser Added to U.S. Fleet 4 1/2 Months After Launching

The commandant, First Naval District, Rear Admiral Felix Gygax, read the order of the Navy Department in placing the ship in commission. A small number of guests, restricted due to wartime conditions, witnessed the ceremonies and heard a group of notables speak briefly, among them being Mayor Dennis J. Roberts of the city of Providence, Governor J. Howard McGrath of Rhode Island, and Rear Admiral Felix Gygax.

Mrs. Mary A. Roberts, mother of the Mayor of Providence, and the ship's sponsor at its launching last December, was introduced to the assembly by the Commanding Officer, Captain William B. Jackson, Jr., U.S.N., who then spoke to the officers and crew of the ship.

May 15, 1945 Providence Commissioned

Providence received many fine gifts from the Citizens of the City of Providence which included an Ice Cream Maker and a Silver Service Set.The city of Providence was very proud of their new ship you had to be there.

Check out this page where the ship's company hosed down the citizens of Newport. http://www.ussprovidence.org/FireHoses.htm

Departing Boston 13 June 1945, Providence (CL-82) completed shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Upon arrival at Newport, R.I., 4 September, she trained prospective cruiser and carrier crews until 6 October.

Departing Boston in November, she visited Piraeus, Greece in December, Istanbul with Missouri (BB-63) 5 to 9 April 1946, and Alexandria, Egypt in May. Leaving the Mediterranean 16 June, she arrived at Philadelphia on the 25th. Following departure from the Delaware Capes in October and training out of Guantanamo Bay and Norfolk, Va., she left Hampton Roads for the Mediterranean 3 February 1947. After exercises and port visits in the Mediterranean she departed Athens, Greece, in May, and arrived at Boston later that month.

Departing Newport, R.I., in November, she operated in the Mediterranean from 20 November 1947 to 2 March 1948, visiting Naples in December, Taranto in January, and Trieste and Venice in February, returning to Newport in March. Sailing from Newport in September 1948, she served the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean from 23 September 1948 to 14 January 1949, visiting Thessalonika in October, Marseilles in November, Trieste and Venice in December, and Oran in January, returning to Newport later in January. She decommissioned at Boston 14 June 1949, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

Reclassified CLG-6 on 23 May 1957, Providence commenced conversion to a guided missile light cruiser at Boston in June 1957. Provided with modern missiles, command ship facilities and a nuclear weapons capability, she recommissioned 17 September 1959, Capt. Kenneth L. Veth in command. Following shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, she arrived at her new home port of Long Beach, Calif., 29 July 1960. After a six month tour of duty with the 7th Fleet, she returned to Long Beach 31 March 1961.

Following exercises off the west coast, she arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, in May 1962, and relieved Oklahoma City (CLG-5) as flagship of the 7th Fleet. During 1962 and 1963, she participated in 7th Fleet exercises. During a three day visit to Saigon in January 1964, she hosted South Vietnamese and American dignitaries, and delivered more than 38 tons of Project Handclasp materials to local humanitarian organizations. Departing Yokosuka in July 1964, she returned to Long Beach in August. In October 1964, she began exercises in the Eastern Pacific. During January to June 1965, she received modern communications equipment. Spending the remainder of 1965 off the west coast with the 1st Fleet, she participated in exercises and visited various west coast ports.

Deployed to WestPac 12 November 1966, she again relieved Oklahoma City as flagship of the 7th Fleet on 1 December 1966 at Yokosuka, Japan. She contributed to a major bombardment of enemy positions in Vietnam 1 April 1967. She dueled with an enemy shore battery off the DMZ on 25 May. In July, she provided gunfire support for amphibious operations. She bombarded enemy storage areas south of Da Nang 10 October.

During 1968, she provided gunfire support off Vietnam during each month except June and December. In February 1968, during the enemy's Tet offensive, gunfire from Providence effected an important breach in the wall of an enemy strongpoint at Hue. During 1969 she operated with the 1st Fleet off the west coast. Into 1970 she remained active with the Pacific Fleet.


USS Providence CL-82 - History


Photo submitted by Carl "Dusty" Dustin)

PROVIDENCE (CL-82) was laid down 27 July 1943 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass. launched 28 December 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Mary Roberts and commissioned 15 May 1945, Capt. W. B. Jackson in command.

Departing Boston 13 June 1945, PROVIDENCE completed shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Upon arrival at Newport, R.I., 4 September, she trained prospective cruiser and carrier crews until 6 October.

Departing Boston in November, she visited Piraeus, Greece in December, Istanbul with MISSOURI (BB-63) 5 to 9 April 1946, and Alexandria, Egypt in May. Leaving the Mediterranean 16 June, she arrived at Philadelphia on the 25th. Following departure from the Delaware Capes in October and training out of Guantanamo Bay and Norfolk, Va., she left Hampton Roads for the Mediterranean 3 February 1947.

After exercises and port visits in the Mediterranean, she departed Athens, Greece in May, and arrived at Boston later that month.


In 2376, the Providence saw action in the war against the Borg when the Collective invaded the Alpha Quadrant to assimilate the Federation and acquire an Omega particle. (TNG video game: Armada)

On stardate 54566.1 (July 26th, 2377), the Providence was at Starbase 176 when the sector was invaded by Borg forces. The ship was left derelict, it's crew either killed or assimilated. A task force led by the USS Enterprise recovered the Providence and the other abandoned ships. When the Borg attacked a second time, the rebuilt fleet defeated them. (TNG video game: Armada II mission: "Recovery")

No final fate is established for this vessel as its name was randomly selected for a Sovereign-class vessel by the game software.


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Watch the video: USS PROVIDENCE - CL82