William Casey

William Casey

William Casey was an influential member of the CIA and an important person concerning affairs around the world.Born March 13, 1913, William Joseph Casey received his education from Fordham University where he received his Bachelor of Science in 1934 and went on to St. John's University School of Law, receiving his Bachelor of Laws in 1937.His education earned him a place in the Office of Strategic Services in 1943, during World War II.After holding many positions within the U.S. government, he was appointed the Director of Central Intelligence by President Ronald Reagan on January 20, 1981.During his career as CIA director, Casey was involved in many such politically-sensitive situations as the Iran-Contra Affair, the Manuel Noriega Crisis, and the trafficking and dealings of drugs by CIA agents.Although Casey was deeply involved in politics and events around the world, his efforts were not well known, including his part in the authorization of the assassination of Ayatollah Mohammed Fadlallah in 1985.Casey died of brain cancer in May 1987.


In 1938 he took a job at Leo Cherne's Research Institute of America. In December 1941, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Casey took a jobs at the Bureau of Economic Warfare and, after receiving a commission as a navy lieutenant in the navy's Office of Procurement, he graduated to the Office of Strategic Services. Ώ]

Casey was a member of Le Cercle, and aggressively promoted a false narrative promoted by fellow member of Le Cercle, Brian Crozier who spoke at the 1979 JCIT on "Soviet Support for International Terrorism". As CIA director, Casey played a large part in the shaping of US Foreign policy under Ronald Reagan, particularly his approach to Soviet international activity. Citing the book, The Terror Network, he echoed Crozier's claim that the Soviet Union was the source of most worldwide terrorist activity. This, in spite of CIA analysts providing evidence that this was in fact black propaganda by the CIA itself. Casey assisted in the rapid expansion of Crozier's UK operations by providing a "suitably substantial budget". Α]


The Life of Reagan’s 1980s Cold Warrior: CIA Director William Casey

During the presidency of Ronald Reagan (1981-89) the Cold War got hotter – and there were a number of major Cold War battlegrounds. Somebody who played a key role in many of these was CIA Director William Casey. Casey was to play a major role in several noteworthy and controversial events, perhaps most infamously in the Iran-Contra Affair. Scott Rose explains.

You can read Scott’s past articles about spies who shared American atomic secrets with the Soviet Union (read here ), the 1950s “Red Scare” ( read here ), the American who supplied the Soviets with secrets in the 1980s (read here ), and Cuban spies in the US in the 1980s (read here ).

William Casey, CIA Director from 1981-1987.

As the Cold War drew to its conclusion, President Ronald Reagan was viewed as the one individual most responsible for the eventual demise of the Soviet Union. Reagan’s “Tear down this wall” speech at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin will probably always be thought of as the beginning of the end of communism in the U.S.S.R. and its satellite states.

However, there was another American official just as responsible for the Cold War victory of the Western world. William J. “Bill” Casey was Reagan’s CIA Director from 1981-1987, and Casey pulled the strings of American Cold War policy, making it his personal crusade to bleed the Soviet Union dry. Undoubtedly, Casey was one of the most powerful CIA Directors to ever hold the position.

Instead of being remembered for his patriotism as Reagan is, Casey’s legacy is quite controversial and unclear. Most Americans who remember Casey will forever associate him with the murky episode known as the Iran-Contra Affair.

Lawyer, Spymaster, Writer

Bill Casey was born in New York in 1913, to a hard-working family with limited financial means. From his childhood onward, Casey was ambitious and determined to change his social status. During his grade school years, he displayed great intellect, while showing a temperamental side as well, earning the nickname “Volcano” from his classmates. The only mark he ever received less than a B grade was a C in personal conduct. He became a caddie at a local golf course and taught himself how to play golf, which would remain a lifelong hobby.

Casey’s good grades got him into Fordham University in Manhattan, followed by law school at St. John’s University. In 1938, he passed the bar exam and began working at a law firm in New York. Casey displayed a talent in business and financial law, and created what is known as the “tax shelter.”

During World War II, Casey went to work for the U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the pre-cursor of the Central Intelligence Agency. He served in France and helped coordinate American spying operations inside Nazi Germany. Fiercely patriotic, Casey was by all accounts very effective in his position managing spies and gleaning vital information as the Allies prepared to invade Germany, and was awarded the Bronze Star for his service. After the war, he would return to his legal practice in New York.

Casey wrote several books about business law during the 1950s the books sold well, and were widely purchased by other American lawyers. He made a small fortune, which was multiplied by successfully investing his earnings into a variety of business ventures and stock holdings. He also lectured on tax law for fourteen years at New York University.

Casey was a strong supporter of Richard Nixon during the election of 1968. Nixon and Casey had common ground both were conservative lawyers, World War II veterans, and staunch anti-Communists. In 1971, Nixon named Casey chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and three years later, Casey became Under Secretary of State for Economic Affairs.

A Partnership with Reagan

During the late 1970s, the United States looked to be losing prestige on the world stage. The Jimmy Carter Administration had failed to check Soviet influence around the world, and the Iran hostage crisis had made Carter appear soft. The American economy was in recession, compounding the nation’s problems in foreign affairs.

Ronald Reagan was challenging Carter in the 1980 election, vowing to restore America to its former glory. An unabashed capitalist and anti-Soviet, Reagan was a candidate Casey could relate to, just as Nixon had been. Upon announcing his candidacy, Reagan named the crafty and tireless Casey to be his campaign chairman. Reagan won in a landslide, and shortly after he was inaugurated, the Americans who had been held hostage in Iran were released. There has been a popular theory that Casey persuaded the Iranians to delay the release in order to weaken the Carter campaign whether or not this was true has never been established.

Reagan asked Casey to become the new CIA Director, but initially Casey was not enthused about the prospect. He wanted to help shape American foreign policy, not merely report intelligence that had been gathered. However, Reagan promised Casey he would be given a large role in the country’s international affairs, and Casey took the job. Still well respected in the intelligence community for his OSS operations, he was a popular choice with many of the senior officials at the CIA.

During the Carter years, the CIA had been vilified in several Senate hearings. The Agency’s budget had been drastically cut, and by 1980 morale had dwindled. Upon becoming Director, Casey sought to rebuild the CIA back into the world’s strongest and most effective intelligence organization. Budgets were increased, and many new agents and administrators were hired. Casey voiced his intention to not only stop the increase of Soviet influence, but to “roll back” the Soviet world presence as well. His understanding of intelligence gathering and economics had put him in a unique position to do just that.

Taking on the Soviets

As the American economy recovered, Casey realized that the Soviet economic system could be damaged through long, drawn-out military operations such as the one in Afghanistan. The Soviets had invaded the country in 1979, but were now engaged in an ongoing conflict with Afghan rebels known as mujahedeen, or freedom-fighters. Casey asked Congress for financial aid for the Afghans, and received even more money than he had asked for. The CIA used these resources to furnish the Afghans with military equipment for use against the Soviets. Before long, the mujahedeenwere using American anti-aircraft missiles to bring down Soviet military helicopters. Just as Casey had expected, the U.S.S.R. poured more money and personnel into the conflict. In all, the Soviets would be bogged down in Afghanistan for nearly ten years, before withdrawing in 1989, losing billions of dollars and thousands of troops along the way.

Casey had hoped to accomplish the same objectives in Nicaragua, where the Soviets were sending $400 million per year to back the communist Sandinista government in its fight against the American-backed Contra forces. However, Congress was not as receptive to aiding the Contras, who had a less-than-stellar record when it came to human rights. Eventually, a bill was passed to limit American aid to the Contras. When the CIA mined harbors in Nicaragua, Casey was called to testify before Congress, and most of his answers were vague and indirect. By this time, Casey spoke in a slurring fashion (referring to Nicaragua as Nica-wag-wa), and there were many occasions when he spoke and left his listeners completely confused. In 1984, Congress passed a second measure, completely banning American aid to the Contras.

Neither Casey nor President Reagan had any intention of letting the Contra cause die. Before the second Congressional Bill was passed, Reagan asked his National Security Advisor, Robert McFarlane, to find a way to keep the Contras afloat. McFarlane and his deputy, Lt. Colonel Oliver North, were able to persuade the royal family of Saudi Arabia to send a million dollars per month to the Contras. This was a far cry from the level of assistance the Sandinistas were receiving from the Soviets, but enough to keep the war going for the foreseeable future. For Casey’s part, he went on record that the CIA no longer had any involvement in Nicaragua.

In 1984, Casey had another huge problem to deal with. William Buckley, the CIA station chief in Lebanon, had been kidnapped by Hezbollah, an Iranian-backed organization. Shortly after Buckley’s kidnapping, American intelligence operatives in Lebanon began to disappear. It was clear that Hezbollah was torturing Buckley to gain information. These fears were confirmed in early 1985 when a videotape arrived, showing Buckley being tortured. Reportedly, the tape was so graphic that several CIA officials openly wept upon watching it.

The Iran-Contra Conundrum

Casey ordered his subordinates to find Buckley’s location and plan a rescue mission. In spite of this, the CIA couldn’t determine where Buckley was, or if he was even still in Lebanon. With each passing day, the Agency became more desperate to find the agent.

Eventually, a shimmer of promise came in the form of an Israeli foreign agent named David Kimche. In July of 1985, Kimche visited Robert McFarlane in Washington, telling the National Security Advisor that there might be a way to get Buckley and six additional American hostages released. Kimche told McFarlane that there was a group of Iranians who wanted American support for overthrowing the anti-American Iranian government of Ayatollah Khomeini. In return, these Iranians would use their influence with Hezbollah to obtain the return of the Americans being held in Lebanon, including Buckley. The point of contact would be an Iranian named Manucher Ghorbanifar.

McFarlane told President Reagan and other cabinet members, including Casey, about his conversation with Kimche. The President and Casey were in full support, while others in the Administration were more suspicious of what they heard. Kimche returned in August, telling McFarlane that Ghorbanifar’s group was asking for American weapons as part of the deal. Secretary of State George Shultz and Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger were opposed to the idea, arguing that it would become an “arms for hostages” situation. Undeterred, Kimche proposed to McFarlane that Israel sell the weapons to Ghorbanifar, with the United States resupplying Israel. Weinberger argued that this would be illegal, while Casey disagreed. McFarlane and Casey supported Kimche’s idea, and ultimately, so did President Reagan. However, Casey had not been forthcoming with the President or McFarlane he was actually already aware of Manucher Ghorbanifar. The CIA had met with the Iranian in 1984, administering two polygraph tests which Ghorbanifar had failed. Afterward, the CIA issued a “burn notice” on Ghorbanifar, meaning he was not to be trusted under any circumstance, a fact Casey made no mention of.

Shortly afterward, the arms shipments began. However, after the first shipment of TOW missiles, Ghorbanifar claimed the shipment had “fallen into the wrong hands.” After the second shipment, Ghorbanifar told McFarlane that Hezbollah would release one hostage, and for McFarlane to pick the hostage. McFarlane promptly picked William Buckley, but to Casey’s horror, the captors replied that Buckley was too ill to be moved, and another hostage would have to be chosen. Within a few months, the American government would find out that Buckley had actually died of a heart attack while being tortured in June of 1985.

The arms shipments continued into 1986 in all, there were seven shipments, with only three hostages being released. Then, in autumn of 1986, the lid was blown off the entire operation. In October, a helicopter carrying supplies to the Contras was shot down in Nicaragua. The lone survivor, an American named Eugene Hasenfus, told the Sandinistas that he was a CIA operative, which Casey denied. Then, in November, a Lebanese magazine reported the arms shipments to Iran. The Reagan Administration initially refuted the allegations, promising an investigation. Later the same month, Attorney General Edwin Meese confirmed not only that the arms shipments had indeed occurred, but also that proceeds from the arms sales had been diverted to the Contras in Nicaragua.

The spotlight turned squarely on Casey and the CIA. He was called to testify before Congress in December however, the morning before he would have testified, Casey suffered a seizure at CIA headquarters. Taken to the hospital, he suffered a second seizure the same day. He was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor, and three days later he had surgery to remove the tumor. Casey would never recover his health, and resigned as CIA Director in January of 1987.

As the Iran-Contra affair unfolded in spring of 1987, several current and former members of the Reagan Administration were called to testify before Congress, but Casey was never able to do so. Most of the American public speculated that Casey was the one person who knew the entire story. On May 5, a former Air Force officer and CIA operative named Richard Secord testified that he organized weapons deliveries to the Contras, under direction of Casey and Oliver North. The next day, Bill Casey passed away.

Legendary Washington Postreporter Bob Woodward wrote a book called Veilabout Casey and the CIA, which includes a controversial story about Casey during his final days. Whether the story is factual or simply sensationalism is up for debate. Woodward claimed to have entered Casey’s hospital room for a few minutes while Casey’s guards were away. According to Woodward, he asked Casey, “You knew about the diversion to the Contras didn’t you?” He claims Casey looked and him and nodded that indeed he had. Woodward also states that he then asked the former CIA Director why he had approved of the events that had taken place, to which Casey faintly replied, “I believed.”

What do you think of the Iran-Contra affair? Let us know below.


ASL. Primary Sources for Quote attributed to William Casey

This page is a copy of the two best articles that I can find to substantiate the following quote:

We’ll Know Our Disinformation Program Is Complete When Everything the American Public Believes Is False

—CIA Director William Casey at an early February 1981 meeting of newly elected President Reagan

I would save you the trouble of researching this yourself. All of the primary sources are copied here. Some insubstantial comments have been omitted. Otherwise, there are no changes except very minor formatting differences.

This is a preservation effort. I am copying this source material in large part because TruthStreamMedia.com was seriously hacked and most of their website has been offline for months now as of this writing. Please note that I’ve included the Quora comment from Melissa Melton because she is the author of the article Infinite Unknown is quoting.

He said it. He meant it, and this glimpse into the heart of the government of the United States of America should evoke feelings not unlike those shared by every citizen of this country on the morning of September 11, 2001 . The enemy is within.

Just do not ever expect to ever find this quote reported by mainstream media. Doing so would be a career, if not life-ending mistake.

Did CIA Director William Casey really say, “We’ll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false”?

I am the source for this quote, which was indeed said by CIA Director William Casey at an early February 1981 meeting of the newly elected President Reagan with his new cabinet secretaries to report to him on what they had learned about their agencies in the first couple of weeks of the administration.

The meeting was in the Roosevelt Room in the West Wing of the White House, not far from the Cabinet Room. I was present at the meeting as Assistant to the chief domestic policy adviser to the President. Casey first told Reagan that he had been astonished to discover that over 80 percent of the ‘intelligence’ that the analysis side of the CIA produced was based on open public sources like newspapers and magazines.

As he did to all the other secretaries of their departments and agencies, Reagan asked what he saw as his goal as director for the CIA, to which he replied with this quote, which I recorded in my notes of the meeting as he said it. Shortly thereafter I told Senior White House correspondent Sarah McClendon, who was a close friend and colleague, who in turn made it public.

Geoffrey Widdison
Nov 25, 2014

Thank you for addressing this in person. Can you tell us what his demeanor was when he said it? Was it straight faced and serious? Was he being sardonic, or trying to make a larger point? Taken without context, it’s hard for me to imagine a person saying this seriously. Even a person who believed in disinformation would have to be amazingly candid to say something like that. Can you offer any more insight into what he was trying to convey?

Hi, Geoffrey — Absolutely straight faced and matter of fact …

Greg Smith, studied at University of California, Santa Cruz
Answered Sep 22, 2014

Ex-DCI Bill Casey’s quote was attributed online as reported only by Mae Brussell, and so, I bounced it off Barbara Honegger because I knew she worked for Mae B back in the day, and here’s what I got on the ACTUAL SOURCE (talk about luck! – I extracted actual email addresses):

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Barbara Honegger
Date: Sun, Sep 21, 2014 at 11:19 PM
Subject: Re: Conference on THE WARREN REPORT AND THE
JFK ASSASSINATION : FIVE DECADES OF
SIGNIFICANT DISCLOSURES
To: Greg Smith
I told Mae about it when we worked together …
On Sun, Sep 21, 2014 at 10:32 PM, Greg Smith wrote:

Thanks Barbara! That’s priceless. The web attributes it to Mae B only, and therefore, it’s discounted in chat and group conversations on social media. You might want to give it better street cred? Your call!

On Sep 21, 2014, at 8:59 PM, Barbara Honegger wrote:

> Seriously — I personally was the Source
> for that William Casey quote. He said it
> at an early Feb. 1981 meeting in the
> Roosevelt Room in the West Wing of
> the White House which I attended, and
> I immediately told my close friend and
> political godmother Senior White House
> Correspondent Sarah McClendon, who
> then went public with it without naming
> the source …
> On Sat, Sep 20, 2014 at 2:49 PM, Greg Smith wrote:
>
> Love to, but can’t break away. I’ll definitely get the DVD for future very intense scrutiny! On that note, in the words of the infamous William J. Casey, “We’ll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false.”

> On Sep 17, 2014, at 1:25 AM, Barbara Honegger wrote:
>> I’m going to try to go to the historic conference.
>> Please try to as well…
>> Barbara
>> On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 8:34 PM, Jerry Policoff wrote:
>> Re: Conference on THE WARREN REPORT AND THE
>> JFK ASSASSINATION : FIVE DECADES OF
>> SIGNIFICANT DISCLOSURES

I love how people are still arguing this quote isn’t real EVEN AFTER THE SOURCE OF THE ORIGINAL QUOTE AT THE WHITE HOUSE IN 1981 comes in here and personally vouches for hearing it with her own ears where and when… Guess the contents of the quote ARE true.

Did CIA Director William Casey Really Say ‘We’ll Know Our Disinformation Program Is Complete When Everything the American Public Believes Is False’?

January 15, 2015 by Infinite

“We’ll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false.”

(Truthstream Media) That creepy quote above has been widely attributed to Former CIA Director William Casey. Casey was the 13th CIA Director from 1981 until he left in January 1987. He died not long after of a brain tumor in May 1987. Dead men tell no tales, as they say.

But did William Casey really say this quote?

The quote itself has been passed around extensively on the Internet, and some people claim Casey never really said it because the only main source it traces back to is late political researcher and radio show host Mae Brussell.

Brussell was the host of the radio show Dialogue: Conspiracy. She got her start when, as a radio show guest, she questioned the official JFK assassination story and the Warren Commission Hearings by suggesting that Lee Harvey Oswald wasn’t the only person involved in Kennedy’s murder. Perhaps the propagandized label of “conspiracy theorist” is the reason why people question the quote Brussell often repeated.

However, Brussell is not the only person that can be attributed to this sharing quote.

Someone posted this meme on Quora back in 2013 with the note, “A disclaimer: I just like Quorans debunking or showing the stupidity behind some of the worst FB memes.”

This is a new trend lately, people trying to debunk old (and most especially, establishment damaging) quotes.

This time, however, someone who claims to have been there when Casey said it showed up to validate the quote:

“I am the source for this quote, which was indeed said by CIA Director William Casey at an early February 1981 meeting of the newly elected President Reagan with his new cabinet secretaries to report to him on what they had learned about their agencies in the first couple of weeks of the administration. The meeting was in the Roosevelt Room in the West Wing of the White House, not far from the Cabinet Room. I was present at the meeting as Assistant to the chief domestic policy adviser to the President. Casey first told Reagan that he had been astonished to discover that over 80 percent of the ‘intelligence’ that the analysis side of the CIA produced was based on open public sources like newspapers and magazines. As he did to all the other secretaries of their departments and agencies, Reagan asked what he saw as his goal as director for the CIA, to which he replied with this quote, which I recorded in my notes of the meeting as he said it. Shortly thereafter I told Senior White House correspondent Sarah McClendon, who was a close friend and colleague, who in turn made it public.”
Barbara Honegger

Not only does Honegger claim he said it, but apparently he said it in response to what he saw as his goal as CIA Director!

This statement was further backed by an email posted by Quora user Greg Smith from Honegger regarding the quote which is consistent and apparently prompted her to tell the story above:

“Seriously — I personally was the Source for that William Casey quote. He said it at an early Feb. 1981 meeting in the Roosevelt Room in the West Wing of the White House which I attended, and I immediately told my close friend and political godmother Senior White House Correspondent Sarah McClendon, who then went public with it without naming the source… “

So there you go. Guess it boils down to he said she said, except when she says it, it’s because she was actually there…

The year 1981 was an interesting one for Director Casey. He just so happened to be under investigation and fighting to keep his new job over various seedy dealings that came to light among them were claims he approved a plan to overthrow Libya’s Moammar Qaddafi to instill a shadow government. (Oh I know, our government would never do that, would they?)

The agency’s plan, according to an article in the July 27, 1981 Gettysburg Times, involved toppling Qaddafi via what else?

“Newsweek Magazine reported the covert operation was designed to overthrow Khadafy through a ‘disinformation’ campaign to embarrass him, creation of a counter government to challenge his leadership and a paramilitary campaign.”

(Wow. A lot of that sounds eerily familiar… 2011, anyone?)

That same year, investigative journalist Jack Anderson published this piece in the September 22, 1981 Santa Cruz Sentinel discussing the troubling CIA disinformation campaign being waged against Americans:

Anderson points out the CIA’s “triple assault on the public’s right to know” included 1) trying to shut off channels of information to the electorate, 2) seeking criminal penalties against reporters whose stories might identify CIA operatives, and the third which Anderson called most troubling, 3) spreading “disinformation” to news agencies.

And who else does Anderson specifically call out in this disinfo campaign but new CIA Director William Casey:

“Now along comes Bill Casey, the dodering CIA director, with the argument that the government has the right to mislead the public by planting phony stories in the press.”

Oh really? So the good director not only talked about his disinformation campaign but actually argued for the government’s right to wage it against the American people?

The plan involved getting around the ban on CIA operations on domestic soil by planting disinfo stories in foreign news outlets that were routinely picked up by American mainstream media agencies. Anderson also points out the various rumors and false stories going around surrounding the goings on in Libya at the time…

The bottom line here is, if anyone in our government was going to make the above disinformation statement and specifically in 1981, all available evidence points to no better person who would have likely said it than Casey.

Finally on an aside, there seems to be this mission lately to memory hole quotes or muddy the water about who said what and change history.

In this particular instance, someone who was there when William Casey said the line in question and claims to have literally heard the words come out of the man’s mouth with her own ears as he said it is vouching that this quote is true.

Then again, this is the same agency on record behind the government’s MKUltra mind control program, an illegal project in which the CIA experimented on Americans for over two decades (that we know about) to manipulate mental states and brain function with everything from drugs to microwaves — the kind of stuff DARPA is openly working on today — all of which makes the piddly quote in question here seem like mere child’s play by comparison.

Even so, people still went into the Quora thread afterwards to claim — with absolutely no evidence whatsoever as they were not personally there — the quote is false.

So, in a bitter twist of the saddest irony possible, it would seem the contents of the quote itself are also true.


WATCH: Take a 360 tour of a former CIA director’s Long Island mansion

A 19th century estate that was owned by a former CIA director is on the market for the first time since 1948.

Known as Mayknoll, the residence was built in 1855 by a former sea captain and William Casey bought it nearly a century later for $50,000. Trained as a lawyer, Casey was a high-ranking intelligence officer in World War II and went on to a career in politics and business.

Some of his roles included a stint as the Under Secretary of State for Economic Affairs under President Richard Nixon, presidential campaign manager for Ronald Reagan, chairman of the SEC, and, most infamously, director of the CIA in the 1980s under Reagan.

His only child, Bernadette, is the current owner of Mayknoll, which comprises of a seven-bedroom mansion, her father’s famous library, two pools, a gym, two kitchens and three guest houses. The sprawling property is being sold in a sealed-bid process with an undisclosed reserve price.

Check out the video above for an exclusive look inside the mansion Casey called home until his death in 1987.


Flashback: “We’ll Know Our Disinformation Program Is Complete When Everything the American Public Believes Is False.”

The creepy quote above has been widely attributed to Former CIA Director William Casey.

Casey was the 13th CIA Director from 1981 until he left in January 1987. He died not long after of a brain tumor in May 1987. Dead men tell no tales, as they say.

But did William Casey really say this quote?

The quote itself has been passed around extensively on the Internet, and some people claim Casey never really said it because the only main source it traces back to is late political researcher and radio show host Mae Brussell.

Brussell was the host of the radio show Dialogue: Conspiracy. She got her start when, as a radio show guest, she questioned the official JFK assassination story and the Warren Commission Hearings by suggesting that Lee Harvey Oswald wasn’t the only person involved in Kennedy’s murder. Perhaps the propagandized label of “conspiracy theorist” is the reason why people question the quote Brussell often repeated.

However, Brussell is not the only person that can be attributed to this sharing quote.

Someone posted this meme on Quora back in 2013 with the note, “A disclaimer: I just like Quorans debunking or showing the stupidity behind some of the worst FB memes.”

This is a new trend lately, people trying to debunk old (and most especially, establishment damaging) quotes.

This time, however, someone who claims to have been there when Casey said it showed up to validate the quote:

“I am the source for this quote, which was indeed said by CIA Director William Casey at an early February 1981 meeting of the newly elected President Reagan with his new cabinet secretaries to report to him on what they had learned about their agencies in the first couple of weeks of the administration. The meeting was in the Roosevelt Room in the West Wing of the White House, not far from the Cabinet Room. I was present at the meeting as Assistant to the chief domestic policy adviser to the President. Casey first told Reagan that he had been astonished to discover that over 80 percent of the ‘intelligence’ that the analysis side of the CIA produced was based on open public sources like newspapers and magazines. As he did to all the other secretaries of their departments and agencies, Reagan asked what he saw as his goal as director for the CIA, to which he replied with this quote, which I recorded in my notes of the meeting as he said it. Shortly thereafter I told Senior White House correspondent Sarah McClendon, who was a close friend and colleague, who in turn made it public.”
— Barbara Honegger

Not only does Honegger claim he said it, but apparently he said it in response to what he saw as his goal as CIA Director!

This statement was further backed by an email posted by Quora user Greg Smith from Honegger regarding the quote which is consistent and apparently prompted her to tell the story above :

“Seriously — I personally was the Source for that William Casey quote. He said it at an early Feb. 1981 meeting in the Roosevelt Room in the West Wing of the White House which I attended, and I immediately told my close friend and political godmother Senior White House Correspondent Sarah McClendon, who then went public with it without naming the source… “

So there you go. Guess it boils down to he said she said, except when she says it, it’s because she was actually there…

The year 1981 was an interesting one for Director Casey. He just so happened to be under investigation and fighting to keep his new job over various seedy dealings that came to light among them were claims he approved a plan to overthrow Libya’s Moammar Qaddafi to instill a shadow government. (Oh I know, our government would never do that, would they?)

The agency’s plan, according to an article in the July 27, 1981 Gettysburg Times, involved toppling Qaddafi via what else?

“Newsweek Magazine reported the covert operation was designed to overthrow Khadafy through a ‘disinformation’ campaign to embarrass him, creation of a counter government to challenge his leadership and a paramilitary campaign.”

(Wow. A lot of that sounds eerily familiar… 2011 in Libya, anyone?)

That same year, investigative journalist Jack Anderson published this piece in the September 22, 1981 Santa Cruz Sentinel discussing the troubling CIA disinformation campaign being waged against Americans:

Anderson points out the CIA’s “triple assault on the public’s right to know” included 1) trying to shut off channels of information to the electorate, 2) seeking criminal penalties against reporters whose stories might identify CIA operatives, and the third which Anderson called most troubling, 3) spreading “disinformation” to news agencies.

And who else does Anderson specifically call out in this disinfo campaign but new CIA Director William Casey:

“Now along comes Bill Casey, the dodering CIA director, with the argument that the government has the right to mislead the public by planting phony stories in the press.”

Oh really? So the good director not only talked about his disinformation campaign but actually argued for the government’s right to wage it against the American people?

The plan involved getting around the ban on CIA operations on domestic soil by planting disinfo stories in foreign news outlets that were routinely picked up by American mainstream media agencies. Anderson also points out the various rumors and false stories going around surrounding the goings on in Libya at the time…

The bottom line here is, if anyone in our government was going to make the above disinformation statement and specifically in 1981, all available evidence points to no better person who would have likely said it than Casey.

Finally on an aside, there seems to be this mission lately to memory hole quotes or muddy the water about who said what and change history.

In this particular instance, someone who was there when William Casey said the line in question and claims to have literally heard the words come out of the man’s mouth with her own ears as he said it is vouching that this quote is true.

Then again, this is the same agency on record behind the government’s MKUltra mind control program, an illegal project in which the CIA experimented on Americans for over two decades (that we know about) to manipulate mental states and brain function with everything from drugs to microwaves — the kind of stuff DARPA is openly working on today — all of which makes the piddly quote in question here seem like mere child’s play by comparison.

Even so, people still went into the Quora thread afterwards to claim — with absolutely no evidence whatsoever as they were not personally there — the quote is false.

So, in a bitter twist of the saddest irony possible, it would seem the contents of the quote itself are also true.


William J. Casey

William Joseph Casey (March 13, 1913 – May 6, 1987) was the Director of Central Intelligence from 1981 to 1987. In this capability he oversaw your complete United States Intelligence Community and personally directed the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). [1] [2] [3] [4]

After Reagan took workplace, Reagan named Casey to the put up of Director of Central Intelligence. [14] Outgoing Director Stansfield Turner characterised the appointment because the “Resurrection of Wild Bill,” referring to Bill Donovan, the good and eccentric head of Office of Strategic Services in World War II, whom Casey vastly admired. [15]

As marketing campaign supervisor of Ronald Reagan’s profitable presidential marketing campaign in 1980, Casey helped to dealer Reagan’s unlikely alliance with vice presidential nominee George H. W. Bush. [13] He then served on the transition crew following the election.

With Antony Fisher, he co-founded the Manhattan Institute in 1978. He is the father-in-law of Owen Smith, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Institute of World Politics and Professor Emeritus at Long Island University. [12]

He then served as Under Secretary of State for Economic Affairs (1973-1974) [4] and chairman of the Export-Import Bank of the United States (1974–1976). During this period, he was additionally a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board (1975–1976) and of counsel to Rogers & Wells (1976–1981).

He served within the Nixon administration because the chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission from 1971 to 1973 [4] [10] this place led to his being referred to as as a prosecution witness towards former Attorney General John N. Mitchell and former Commerce Secretary Maurice Stans in an influence-peddling case stemming from worldwide financier Robert Vesco’s $200,000 contribution to the Nixon reelection marketing campaign. [11]

Following the dissolution of the OSS in September 1945, Casey returned to his authorized and enterprise ventures. After serving as a particular counsel to the United States Senate (1947–1948) and affiliate basic counsel to the Point Four Program (1948), [5] Casey based the Institute for Business Planning in 1950 there, he amassed a lot of his early wealth (compounded by investments) by writing a number of data-driven publications on enterprise legislation. [8] He was a lecturer in tax legislation on the New York University School of Law from 1948 to 1962. [5] From 1957 to 1971, he was a accomplice at Hall, Casey, Dickler & Howley, a New York company legislation agency, beneath the auspices of founding accomplice and outstanding Republican politician Leonard W. Hall. [5] He ran as a Republican for New York’s third congressional district in 1966, however was defeated within the major by former Congressman Steven Derounian. [9]

During World War II, he labored for the Office of Strategic Services, the place he grew to become head of its Secret Intelligence Branch in Europe. [4] [7] He served within the United States Naval Reserve till December 1944 earlier than remaining in his OSS place as a civilian till his resignation in September 1945 as an officer, he attained the rank of lieutenant and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achievement.

Following his admission to the bar, he was a accomplice within the New York–based mostly Buckner, Casey, Doran and Siegel from 1938 to 1942. Concurrently, as chairman of the board of editors of the Research Institute of America (1938–1949), [5] Casey initially conceptualized the tax shelter and “defined to businessmen how little they want[ed] to do to be able to keep on the precise facet of New Deal regulatory laws.” [6]


William V. Casey: Photo 1

Carnegie Branch Library for Local History is temporarily closed.
Basic research and scanning services are available by emailing [email protected]

14 photographs, 10 views (5 digitized).

One half-tone and nine photographs of William V. Casey, spanning the years he lived in Boulder, Colo.

Photo 1 - Wm. V. Casey ca. 1880s.
Photo 2 - William V. Casey portrait ca. 1900. (someone wrote in pencil all over the photographs)
Photo 3 - "Mr. Casey, Sup't."
Photo 4 - William Casey at his desk with a telephone ca. 1930s.
Photo 5 - William Casey portrait, ca.1940.
Photo 6 - Wm. Casey, Clara Webster, & Mrs. R. E. Arnett.
Photo 7 - Wm. Casey and H.O. Andrew.
Photo 8 - Wm. Casey and James H. Buchanan.
Photo 9 - Teacher and School Board on February 20, 1944, the day North Side Intermediate name was changed to Casey Junior High. Names are on the back of the photograph taken by Irv Demmon.
Photo 10 - University Hill School Banquet, 1940s. Names are on the back of the photograph.

William V. Casey came to Boulder in 1884 to be an assistant to his brother, Robert Casey who was superintendent of schools. When his brother decided to devote all his time to mining, William finished his term. He was elected superintendent in 1889, reelected in 1892, defeated in 1893, and finally served from 1894-1934 when he became superintendent emeritus.
North Side [Northside] Junior High was renamed Casey Junior High in 1944. Three of the photographs in this envelope were taken on the steps of the school after the renaming ceremony on February 20, 1944. His son, Robert, cared for him at his home at 820 Pine until his death on August 31, 1944.

Copyright RIGHTS: Materials in this collection may be used freely for any purpose, with attribution to the Carnegie Library for Local History, Boulder. No duplicated materials may be deposited or placed on file in any other archive, museum, library or similar repository. Questions of copyright are the responsibility of the user.


Casey History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

In its ancient Gaelic form, the Irish name Casey was written O Cathasaigh, from the word "cathasach," which means watchful.

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Early Origins of the Casey family

The surname Casey was first found in the counties of Fermanagh, Mayo, Dublin, Limerick, Cork and Roscommon. In early times, there were six unrelated septs of O Cathasaigh the two most important were the erenagh (church steward) families of Devenish in the county of Fermanagh and the Lords of the Suaithni, in the present-day barony of Balrothery West, in County Dublin. The name has since become widely scattered. Although it remains common in County Dublin, it is now most prevalent in the southwest of Munster, with a smaller but still sizable population in north Connacht. This corresponds with the locations of the other four septs, which were found at Liscannon near Bruff in the County Limerick near Mitchelstown in County Cork in Clondara in County Roscommon and in Tirawley in County Mayo, where two Casey septs were located. The Caseys of Mayo and Roscommon, like those in Fermanagh, were also notable as erenaghs. Archaeological remains indicate that Caseys were also once found near Waterford. Furthermore, a sept of MacCasey was once located at Oriel and was common in County Monaghan. However, this sept is nearly extinct today. Due to the widespread dropping of Irish prefixes under British rule and their often-erroneous resumption in the 20th century, many MacCaseys are incorrectly thought to be O'Caseys.

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Early History of the Casey family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Casey research. Another 113 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1172, 1381, 1787, 1862, 1846 and 1870 are included under the topic Early Casey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Casey Spelling Variations

Up until the mid twentieth century, surnames throughout the world were recorded by scribes with little regard of spelling. They recorded the name as they thought the surname should be spelt. Accordingly, research into the name Casey revealed spelling variations, including Casey, MacCasey, O'Casey and others.

Early Notables of the Casey family (pre 1700)

Another 39 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Casey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Casey migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Casey Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Richard Casey, who arrived in Virginia in 1636 [1]
  • Ann Casey, who landed in Maryland in 1663 [1]
Casey Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • William Casey, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [1]
  • Elizabeth Casey who arrived in Maryland in 1725
  • Con Casey, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1765 [1]
  • Edward Casey, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1766 [1]
Casey Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Peter Casey, who arrived in New York, NY in 1811 [1]
  • George Casey, who arrived in New York, NY in 1812 [1]
  • Alexander Casey, aged 45, who arrived in Tennessee in 1812 [1]
  • Henry Casey, aged 26, who landed in Louisiana in 1813 [1]
  • Mr. Casey, who arrived in New York, NY in 1815 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Casey migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Casey Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Daniel Casey, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749
  • James Casey, who landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749
  • James Casey, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • John Casey, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Ann Casey, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Casey Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Eugene Casey, aged 32, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the barque "Pallas" from Cork, Ireland
  • Dennis Casey, aged 30, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the barque "Pallas" from Cork, Ireland
  • Norry Casey, aged 11, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Hibernia" from Kinsale, Ireland
  • Timothy Casey, aged 32, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Hibernia" from Kinsale, Ireland
  • Mary Casey, aged 30, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Hibernia" from Kinsale, Ireland
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Casey migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Casey Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Casey, Irish convict who was convicted in Cork, Ireland for 7 years for being a Political prisoner, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 29th November 1801, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[2]
  • Mr. Cornelius Casey, (b. 1800), aged 22, Irish convict who was convicted in County Kerry, Ireland for life, transported aboard the "Brampton" on 8th November 1822, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, he died in 1823 aboard the ship [3]
  • John Casey, a carpenter, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Mr. Patrick Casey, (b. 1807), aged 19, Irish convict who was convicted in Cork, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Boyne" on 28th October 1826, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, he died in 1834 [4]
  • Miss Mary Casey, (b. 1803), aged 25, Irish farm labourer who was convicted in Limerick, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "City of Edinburgh I" on 23rd June 1828, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, she died in 1839 [5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Casey migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Casey Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Casey, Irish settler arriving as Detachment of the Royal New Zealand Fencibles travelling aboard the ship "Sir Robert Sale" from Gravesend via Cork arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th October 1847 [6]
  • Mrs. Mary Casey Née Carroll, Irish settler travelling aboard the ship "Sir Robert Sale" from Gravesend via Cork arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th October 1847 [6]
  • Mr. Martin Casey, (b. 1936), aged , Irish settler travelling aboard the ship "Sir Robert Sale" from Gravesend via Cork arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th October 1847 [6]
  • Miss Margaret Casey, (b. 1838), aged , Irish settler travelling aboard the ship "Sir Robert Sale" from Gravesend via Cork arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th October 1847 [6]
  • Mr. John Casey, (b. 1847), aged 6 months, Irish settler travelling aboard the ship "Sir Robert Sale" from Gravesend via Cork arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 11th October 1847, he died on board the ship [6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Casey (post 1700) +

  • Peter Casey (1935-2018), Irish horse trainer from Dublin
  • William "Willie" Casey (1932-2016), Irish Gaelic footballer
  • John Keegan Casey (1846-1870), Irish poet
  • Eamon Casey (b. 1927), Roman Catholic Bishop Emeritus of Galway and Kilmacduagh, Ireland
  • Bernard Terry "Bernie" Casey (1939-2017), American actor, poet, and professional football player
  • Kerry James Casey (1954-2015), Australian actor, writer, director, and performance teacher
  • Kellogg Casey (1877-1938), American winner of a gold and a sliver Olympic medal for shooting at the 1908 games
  • Ron Casey (1952-2014), American politician, Member of the Missouri House of Representatives (2004-2012)
  • Len Casey (b. 1953), English rugby league footballer
  • Kenneth Casey (1899-1965), American composer, publisher, author and child actor
  • . (Another 11 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Casey family +

Halifax Explosion
  • Mr. John Joseph  Casey (1880-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [7]
HMS Royal Oak
  • William P. Casey, British Leading Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [8]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. Martin Casey, English 2nd Class Cabin Bed Steward from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [9]
  • Mr. James Casey, English Fireman from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [9]
  • Mr. Joseph Casey, English Fireman from Bootle, Lancashire, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [9]
  • Mr. Patrick Casey, (James O'Mealie), English Fireman from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking and was recovered [9]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Thomas Casey (d. 1912), aged 28, English Trimmer from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [10]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. James Warren Casey, American Seaman First Class from Washington, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [11]

Related Stories +

The Casey Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Per varios casus
Motto Translation: By various fortunes.


Share William Casey Marland

Thirty-four-year-old William Casey Marland (March 26, 1918-November 26, 1965) was elected governor of West Virginia in 1952, at the height of a meteoric career. Only five years earlier he had been a law student at West Virginia University.

Born in Illinois, Marland moved at age seven with his family to Glen Rogers, Wyoming County. His father was mine superintendent there. Marland was educated at the University of Alabama and WVU Law School, with time out for service in the navy in World War II. He received his law degree in June 1947, and the following August was named law clerk for Judge Ben Moore of the U.S. District Court for Southern West Virginia, a position traditionally offered to the top law student each year at WVU . In August 1948, Marland was made assistant attorney general by Attorney General Ira J. Partlow. This was followed by Marland’s appointment in late December 1949 by Governor Patteson to the position of attorney general (vacated by Partlow), which resulted in his subsequent election to that office in 1950.

In late 1951, Kanawha County Democratic boss Homer Hanna Sr. and Governor Patteson decided that the much maligned Democratic ‘‘statehouse machine’’ needed a new face to offer the electorate as their next governor. They turned to their young attorney general, Marland.

Although the Democrats had placed five consecutive candidates in the governor’s mansion since 1932, there were bitter divisions within the party. A long-festering schism between pro-labor FDR liberals led by M. M. Neely and pro-industry, anti- FDR conservatives led by Homer ‘‘Rocky’’ Holt (and later complicated by a third group of ‘‘anti-corruption’’ independents), made Marland’s nomination in the 1952 Democratic primary difficult. This same internal division, combined with Republican charges of statehouse corruption, made Marland’s general election race against Republican Rush D. Holt a real cliffhanger. Even with the help of Senator Neely and United Mine Workers President John L. Lewis, Marland posted only a narrow 26,000-vote victory on election day, November 4, 1952. The Democratic Party’s hold on the governorship would end in 1956 with the election of another 34-year-old, Republican Cecil Underwood.

Marland quickly exhibited his maverick nature when he introduced a ten cents per ton severance tax on the state’s natural resources, principally coal. The legislature, dominated by the coal industry and the Chamber of Commerce, repeatedly beat back attempts by the governor to upgrade the state’s highways and schools via the proposed severance tax. The measure was defeated by Marland’s own party during his first three months in office, which signaled the beginning of four frustrating years for the young governor.

Governor Marland often took decisive action when faced with big decisions, such as the severance tax. His personal campaign for industrial development saw him barnstorming from coast to coast in an effort to lure industry to West Virginia. He is best remembered for his no-nonsense implementation of public school desegregation following the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education. On the other hand, Marland was guilty of perpetuating the infamous statehouse spoils system by giving both his father and brother high-salaried jobs. This unpopular behavior combined with his abrupt manner and an increasing use of alcohol created serious political and personal problems.

U.S. Sen. Harley Kilgore died in early 1956. Barred by law from seeking a second term as governor, Marland made a strong bid for Kilgore’s seat, only to lose to Republican Chapman Revercomb and the Eisenhower landslide. In 1958, the death of Senator Neely gave Marland another chance at high office. This attempt fell short when he was defeated in the August primary by Jennings Randolph.

Marland struggled financially between the two senatorial contests, and in January 1960, he left West Virginia for a sales job in Chicago. From then on, the former governor’s drinking problem advanced into total alcoholism, causing him to lose the job and his health. After several periods of hospitalization, he joined Alcoholics Anonymous. In the summer of 1962, he took a job as a taxi driver to ‘‘compose his character,’’ as he put it. Three years later with his alcoholism arrested, a chance remark to a passenger prompted his discovery by a Chicago Daily News reporter. His subsequent reentry into the mainstream of society drew national attention. Sadly, his new life ended eight months later when he died of cancer at the age of 47.

In some respects a tragic figure, Bill Marland nonetheless was a politician ahead of his time. Since his death, most of his ideas have been implemented, including the coal severance tax, economic diversification, a state income tax, an expanded state park system, and improved public education and transportation systems.


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